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Central Park, New York NY | Nearby Businesses


5 Av To Central Park W, 59 St To 110 St
New York, NY 10022

(212) 310-6600

Landmark Near Central Park

Strawberry Fields
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
72nd St Entrance at Central Park West
New York, NY 10021

(646) 862-0997 Ext 36

Strawberry Fields is a 2.5-acre (1.0 ha) landscaped section in New York City's Central Park that is dedicated to the memory of former Beatle John Lennon. It is named after the Beatles' song "Strawberry Fields Forever" written by Lennon. __notoc__DescriptionDesignThe Central Park memorial was designed by Bruce Kelly, the chief landscape architect for the Central Park Conservancy. Strawberry Fields was dedicated on what would have been Lennon's 45th birthday, October 9, 1985, by New York Mayor Ed Koch and Lennon's widow Yoko Ono, who had underwritten the project. The entrance to the memorial is located on Central Park West at West 72nd Street, directly across from the Dakota Apartments, where Lennon had lived for the latter part of his life, and where he was murdered in 1980. The memorial is a triangular piece of land falling away on the two sides of the park, and its focal point is a circular pathway mosaic of inlaid stones, with a single word, the title of Lennon's famous song: "Imagine". This was a gift from the city of Naples, Italy. Along the borders of the area surrounding the mosaic are benches which are endowed in memory of other individuals and maintained by the Central Park Conservancy. Along a path toward the southeast, a plaque on a low glaciated outcropping of schist lists the nations which contributed to building the memorial. Yoko Ono, who still lives in The Dakota, contributed over a million dollars for the landscaping and the upkeep endowment.

Strawberry Fields, Central Park
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
Central Park West (near W 72nd St)
New York, NY 10023

212-310-6600

Bethesda Fountain
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
14 E 60th St
New York, NY 10024

212-310-6600

Alice in Wonderland Statue in Central Park
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
East Side at 75th St
New York, NY 10021

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Tavern-on-the-Green
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
67 Central Park W
New York, NY 10023

Tavern on the Green is an American cuisine restaurant located in Central Park in Manhattan, New York City, near the intersection of Central Park West at West 66th Street on the Upper West Side. It originally operated from 1934 to 2009 under various owners. From 2010 until 2012, the building was used as a public visitors center and gift shop run by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. After undergoing a multimillion-dollar renovation, Tavern on the Green reopened as a restaurant on April 24, 2014.The restaurant in 2007 had gross revenues of $38 million, from more than 500,000 visitors, making it the second-highest-grossing independent restaurant in the United States (behind The Venetian's Tao restaurant in Las Vegas, at $67 million).HistoryThe building housing the restaurant was originally the sheepfold that housed the sheep that grazed Sheep Meadow, built to a design by Calvert Vaux in 1870. It became a restaurant as part of a 1934 renovation of the park under Robert Moses, New York City's Commissioner of Parks.War and post-war: 1930s through 1970sFrom 1934, the landmark restaurant was managed by restaurateurs licensed by the City of New York's Park Department. In 1943 Arnold Schleifer and his nephews, Arthur Schleifer and Julius Berman, won the contract to operate the restaurant. During their tenure, the dance floor was enlarged and nightly music was enjoyed. A large outdoor patio offered dining al fresco. Trees were first wrapped in the well-known twinkling lights around the property, and the Elm Tree Room was built to surround one of the city's classic American elms. The menu was designed to be elegant but affordable for New Yorkers. Luncheon and dinner offerings changed regularly, and Mr. Berman would often add special desserts to celebrate family events, e.g., "Parfait Ruth" to honor the birth of his granddaughter.

The Dakota
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
1 West 72nd Street
New York, NY 10023

(212) 362-1448

The Dakota is a cooperative apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City, United States. It was built in 1880–1884 and is considered to be one of Manhattan's most prestigious and exclusive cooperative residential buildings, with apartments generally selling for between $4 million and $30 million. The Dakota is famous as the home of former Beatle John Lennon from 1973 to his death outside the building in 1980.HistoryThe Dakota was constructed between October 25, 1880, and October 27, 1884. The architectural firm of Henry Janeway Hardenbergh was commissioned to create the design for Edward Clark, head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The firm also designed the Plaza Hotel.The Dakota was purportedly so named because at the time of construction, the Upper West Side was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote in relation to the inhabited area of Manhattan as the Dakota Territory was. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper interview with the Dakota's long-time manager, quoted in Christopher Gray's book New York Streetscapes: "Probably it was called 'Dakota' because it was so far west and so far north". According to Gray, it is more likely that the building was named the Dakota because of Clark's fondness for the names of the new western states and territories.

The Dakota Building
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
1 West 72nd St
New York, NY 10023

(212) 362-1448

Central Park Carousel
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
65th St
New York, NY 10021

(212) 439-6900

The Central Park Carousel, officially the Michael Friedsam Memorial Carousel, but referred to as the Trump Carousel, is a vintage carousel located in Central Park in Manhattan, New York City, at the southern end of the park, near East 65th Street. It is the fourth carousel in the park since 1871, all located at the same site, and is part of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission's Central Park Scenic Landmark.Installed in the park in 1951 with a new structure surrounding it, it is one of the largest merry-go-rounds in the United States, and was made by Solomon Stein and Harry Goldstein in 1908. It was originally installed in the trolley terminal in Coney Island in Brooklyn, where it operated until the 1940s.The original 1871 Central Park carousel was powered by a mule or horse under the carousel's platform, signaled to start and stop by the operator tapping his foot. Two succeeding rides were destroyed by fires in 1924 and 1950. The current carousel, which was restored in 1990, has 57 hand-carved horses - 52 jumpers and 5 standers - and two chariots. It is open seven days a week when weather permits, and serves around 250,000 riders every year. The carousel has a Ruth & Sohn band organ playing waltzes, marches, and polkas.2010 Lease to Donald TrumpIn 2010, the City evicted the previous tenant who managed the Carousel and the Trump Organization, a prominent New York City conglomerate headed by public figure Donald J. Trump, stepped in as the new tenant. In return for a lease until 2020, Trump promised to invest $400,000 in renovations over ten years and pay a yearly lease that started at $250,000 and scaled up to $325,000. In statements released as part of the Trump presidential campaign, the Carousel grossed $1.72 million between 2013 and the end of 2015. The Trump Organization has also managed the nearby Wollman Rink on and off since 1987.

Bethesda Terrace, Central Park
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
Mid-Park at 72nd St
New York, NY 10023

(212) 310-6600

Bow Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
Central Park
New York, NY 10024

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Bethesda Arcade, Central Park
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
Mid-Park at 72nd Street
New York, NY 10023

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740 Park Avenue
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
740 Park Ave
New York, NY 10021

740 Park Avenue is a luxury cooperative apartment building on Park Avenue between East 71st and 72nd Streets in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, which was described in Business Insider in 2011 as "a legendary address" that was "at one time considered (and still thought to be by some) the most luxurious and powerful residential building in New York City". The "pre-war" building's side entrance address is 71 East 71st Street.The 17-story building was designed in an Art Deco architectural style and consists of 31 units, including duplexes and triplexes. The architectural height of the building is 78.03m.HistoryThe building was constructed in 1929 by James T. Lee, the grandfather of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis – Onassis lived there as a child – and was designed by Rosario Candela and Arthur Loomis Harmon; Harmon became a partner of the newly named Shreve, Lamb and Harmon during the year of construction. The building was officially opened in October 1930, but it was not until the 1980s that the building's apartments sold for incredibly high prices. Hedge fund manager David Ganek paid $19 million for the childhood duplex home of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis in 2005.

Bethesda Fountain
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
14 E 60th St
New York, NY 10021

(212) 310-6600

Bethesda Terrace, of which Bethesda Fountain is the centerpiece, overlooks The Lake in New York City's Central Park.The terraceBethesda Terrace is on two levels, united by two grand staircases and a lesser one that passes under Terrace Drive to provide passage southward to the Elkan Naumburg bandshell and The Mall, of which this is the architectural culmination, the theatrical set-piece at the center of the park. The upper terrace flanks the 72nd Street Cross Drive and the lower terrace provides a podium for viewing the Lake. The mustard-olive colored carved stone is New Brunswick sandstone, with a harder stone for cappings, with granite steps and landings, and herringbone paving of Roman brick laid on edge.Bethesda Terrace became a site for an outdoor luncheon restaurant at the end of the 1960s, then became a congregating spot for the Hair generation before devolving into a drug-trafficking venue in the 1970s. The fountain, which had been dry for decades, was restored in its initial campaign, 1980–81, by the Central Park Conservancy as the centerpiece of its plan to renovate Central Park. The Terrace, designed by Vaux with sculptural decoration by Mould, was restored in the following season, its stonework disassembled, cleaned, deteriorated surfaces removed, restored and patched and reset.Resodding, and fifty new trees, 3,500 shrubs and 3,000 ground cover plants specified by Philip Winslow followed in 1986, most of which, having matured into dense blocks, were removed in 2008, to make way for plants native to the United States. The Minton encaustic tiles of the ceiling of the arcade between the flanking stairs, designed by Mould, were removed in 1987, cleaned, restored, completed with additional new tiles and reinstalled in 2007.

Arsenal (Central Park)
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
830 5th Avenue
New York, NY 10065

(212)360-8163

The Arsenal is a symmetrical brick building with modestly Gothic Revival details, located in Central Park, New York City, centered on 64th Street off Fifth Avenue. Built between 1847 and 1851 as a storehouse for arms and ammunition for the New York State Militia, the building predates the design and construction of Central Park, where only the Blockhouse (1814) is older.The Arsenal was designed by Martin E. Thompson (1786–1877), originally trained as a carpenter, who had been a partner of Ithiel Town and went on to become one of the founders of the National Academy of Design. Thompson's symmetrical structure of brick in English bond, with headers every fifth course, presents a central block in the manner of a fortified gatehouse flanked by half-octagonal towers. The carpentry doorframe speaks of its purpose with an American eagle displayed between stacks of cannonballs over the door, and crossed sabers and stacked pikes represented in flanking panels.The building currently houses the offices of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation and the Central Park Wildlife Conservation Center, but it has also served as a zoo and housed a portion of the American Museum of Natural History's collections while its permanent structure was being erected. During the course of its lifetime it has also housed a police precinct, a weather bureau, and an art gallery.

Arsenal (Central Park)
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
830 5th Avenue
New York, NY 10065

(212)360-8163

The Arsenal is a symmetrical brick building with modestly Gothic Revival details, located in Central Park, New York City, centered on 64th Street off Fifth Avenue. Built between 1847 and 1851 as a storehouse for arms and ammunition for the New York State Militia, the building predates the design and construction of Central Park, where only the Blockhouse (1814) is older.The Arsenal was designed by Martin E. Thompson (1786–1877), originally trained as a carpenter, who had been a partner of Ithiel Town and went on to become one of the founders of the National Academy of Design. Thompson's symmetrical structure of brick in English bond, with headers every fifth course, presents a central block in the manner of a fortified gatehouse flanked by half-octagonal towers. The carpentry doorframe speaks of its purpose with an American eagle displayed between stacks of cannonballs over the door, and crossed sabers and stacked pikes represented in flanking panels.The building currently houses the offices of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation and the Central Park Wildlife Conservation Center, but it has also served as a zoo and housed a portion of the American Museum of Natural History's collections while its permanent structure was being erected. During the course of its lifetime it has also housed a police precinct, a weather bureau, and an art gallery.

The San Remo
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
145 Central Park West
New York, NY 10023

(212) 877-0300

The San Remo is a luxury, 27-floor, co-operative apartment building in Manhattan located between West 74th Street and West 75th Street, three blocks north of The Dakota. Opened in 1930, the San Remo is described by Glen Justice of the New York Times as "a dazzling two-tower building with captivating views of Central Park." As a housing cooperative, its board has a reputation for "lenient admissions standards" compared to the conservative, old-money boards on the other side of the park.ApartmentsWhen the San Remo was originally designed, it had a wide range of relatively luxurious apartment configurations. The apartments were accessed from opulent twin lobbies which contained terrazzo floors, marble walls and custom light fixtures of bronze and frosted glass. The building has two addresses, 145 and 146 Central Park West, because the building was designed so that each half of the structure is served by separate lobbies, eliminating the need for long hallways across the main floor. There are still some doctor's offices on the first floor, but several of the professional/commercial spaces have recently been sold to tenants who reside in the building for use as office space.BaseThe average apartment contained eight rooms spread over approximately 3000sqft. Ten and eleven foot ceilings were the norm. As originally designed, the lower 14 floors were typically divided into seven apartments – two on each of the side street wings of the building and three laid out along the front of the building facing Central Park West. There are numerous setbacks built into the far ends of each wing of the building, allowing for terraces for several of the units. The original layout of the Park-facing units was unusual; most full-block buildings on the avenue divided the park frontage into four units, not three. This allowed the San Remo's apartments to have very generous frontage along the park in addition to typically spacious interior layouts.

55 Central Park West
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
55 Central Park West
New York, NY 10023

(212) 621-9870

55 Central Park West is a 19-floor housing cooperative located in Manhattan, New York City. The building was built in 1929 and designed by the firm Schwartz and Gross. Both the interior and the exterior possess unique architectural features that set the structure apart from its peers. The building is considered a contributing property within the Central Park West Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.The building holds significance in American popular culture because scenes from the 1984 film Ghostbusters were shot there, as it is the setting for the climax of that film.HistoryPlans for the building were filed by architectural firm Schwartz and Gross at the behest of Victor Earle and John C. Calhoun, for whom they were working. Earle, and his brother Guyon, had been actively developing the Upper West Side of New York City since the 1910s.The structure, between 65th and 66th Streets, is considered to be mostly "second tier" by the socialite New Yorkers who occupy most of the buildings along Central Park West, and was opened as a rental property in 1930. Its neighbor to the south is the earlier Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. Upon its opening Real Estate magazine praised it as resembling "Jungfrau, that most beloved snowcapped Alpine peak." Musician Rudy Vallee, whose salary was up to $20,000 per week, was one of the building's earliest residents. Ginger Rogers was one of its residents during her Broadway days in the early 1930s.Legendary hat designer Lilly Dache with husband Jean Despres of Coty Perfume fame were residents following their 1931 marriage till 1935 when they moved to their architectural award winning art deco building off Park Avenue.

55 Central Park West
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
55 Central Park West
New York, NY 10023

(212) 621-9870

55 Central Park West is a 19-floor housing cooperative located in Manhattan, New York City. The building was built in 1929 and designed by the firm Schwartz and Gross. Both the interior and the exterior possess unique architectural features that set the structure apart from its peers. The building is considered a contributing property within the Central Park West Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.The building holds significance in American popular culture because scenes from the 1984 film Ghostbusters were shot there, as it is the setting for the climax of that film.HistoryPlans for the building were filed by architectural firm Schwartz and Gross at the behest of Victor Earle and John C. Calhoun, for whom they were working. Earle, and his brother Guyon, had been actively developing the Upper West Side of New York City since the 1910s.The structure, between 65th and 66th Streets, is considered to be mostly "second tier" by the socialite New Yorkers who occupy most of the buildings along Central Park West, and was opened as a rental property in 1930. Its neighbor to the south is the earlier Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. Upon its opening Real Estate magazine praised it as resembling "Jungfrau, that most beloved snowcapped Alpine peak." Musician Rudy Vallee, whose salary was up to $20,000 per week, was one of the building's earliest residents. Ginger Rogers was one of its residents during her Broadway days in the early 1930s.Legendary hat designer Lilly Dache with husband Jean Despres of Coty Perfume fame were residents following their 1931 marriage till 1935 when they moved to their architectural award winning art deco building off Park Avenue.

1 Lincoln Plaza
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
1 Lincoln Plz
New York, NY 10023

(212) 595-5121

1 Lincoln Plaza is a mixed-use, commercial and luxury residential condominium building in New York City with 43 floors and 671 units. Construction began in 1971. The building is in the heart of the Lincoln Center neighborhood. Completed and ready for occupancy in 1974, the building is divided into eight floors of commercial space and 36 floors of luxury residential apartments. The roof, which is often considered the 44th Floor is home to the building's private fitness club called Top of the One.UsageA five-story residential building at 33 West 63rd Street, a tenement constructed in the 1890s owned by Jehiel R. Elyachar, became the target of an effort by Paul Milstein to assemble a group of properties that would become the site of 1 Lincoln Plaza. After lengthy negotiations, Milstein and Elyachar had agreed to a deal in which Milstein would acquire the property for cash, and then agreed to an exchange for a building on the Upper East Side. Though a verbal agreement had been reached, Elyachar insisted that a donation of $100,000 be made to one of the charitable organizations he supported, at which point Milstein walked away and said "You know what, you're going to keep your building". Howard Milstein, Paul's son, called the negotiations as being "among the most glaring examples of someone who overplayed their hand". The surrounding buildings on the site were demolished and 1 Lincoln Plaza was constructed around Elyachar's building at 33 West 63rd Street.The building has multiple addresses other than "1 Lincoln Plaza", including 20 West 64th Street, 33 West 63rd Street, 1897 Broadway, and 1900 Broadway. Provided a unit number is included, any mail sent to any of the above addresses will reach the required tenant.

The Majestic (New York City)
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
115 Central Park W
New York, NY 10023

(212) 873-6800

The Majestic is a twin-towered housing cooperative skyscraper located at 115 Central Park West between 71st Street and 72nd Street in Manhattan, New York City. The steel framed building was constructed in 1930-1931 and designed in the Art Deco style by architect and real estate developer Irwin S. Chanin with the assistance of his French associate, Jacques Delamarre. The futuristic sculptures on the building's facade are by Rene Chambellan.The building was originally planned to be a 45 story hotel, but the plans were changed midway through construction due to the Great Depression and the passing of the Multiple Dwelling Act, which restricted a building's height immediately above the street, but allowed tall towers if the property was sufficiently large. The Majestic replaced the Hotel Majestic, designed by Alfred Zucker in 1894 at the same site, which had been home to Gustav Mahler and Edna Ferber, among others.The Majestic has 238 apartments in 29 stories, and is one of four buildings on Central Park West which feature two towers, the others being: The San Remo, The Century - also designed and built by Chanin - and The Eldorado.

Park Near Central Park

Central Park Location
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
5 Av To Central Park the mall
New York, NY 10024

+1 212-310-

Central Park
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
5th Ave & 60th St
New York, NY 10028

The Loeb Boathouse at Central Park
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
E 72nd St at Park Ave
New York, NY 10021

(212) 517-2233

New Yorkers and tourists alike appreciate the unique ability to enjoy a great meal in an idyllic setting. The Boathouse is one of New York City's most iconic destinations, and a must-see in Central Park.

Central Park
Distance: 0.0 mi Competitive Analysis
59th St to 110th St (5th Ave to Central Park West)
New York, NY 10029

(212) 310-6600

Central Park South, NYC
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
Central Park South
New York, NY 10019

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Strawberry Fields
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
72nd St Entrance at Central Park West
New York, NY 10021

(646) 862-0997 Ext 36

Strawberry Fields is a 2.5-acre (1.0 ha) landscaped section in New York City's Central Park that is dedicated to the memory of former Beatle John Lennon. It is named after the Beatles' song "Strawberry Fields Forever" written by Lennon. __notoc__DescriptionDesignThe Central Park memorial was designed by Bruce Kelly, the chief landscape architect for the Central Park Conservancy. Strawberry Fields was dedicated on what would have been Lennon's 45th birthday, October 9, 1985, by New York Mayor Ed Koch and Lennon's widow Yoko Ono, who had underwritten the project. The entrance to the memorial is located on Central Park West at West 72nd Street, directly across from the Dakota Apartments, where Lennon had lived for the latter part of his life, and where he was murdered in 1980. The memorial is a triangular piece of land falling away on the two sides of the park, and its focal point is a circular pathway mosaic of inlaid stones, with a single word, the title of Lennon's famous song: "Imagine". This was a gift from the city of Naples, Italy. Along the borders of the area surrounding the mosaic are benches which are endowed in memory of other individuals and maintained by the Central Park Conservancy. Along a path toward the southeast, a plaque on a low glaciated outcropping of schist lists the nations which contributed to building the memorial. Yoko Ono, who still lives in The Dakota, contributed over a million dollars for the landscaping and the upkeep endowment.

Strawberry Fields, Central Park
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
Central Park West (near W 72nd St)
New York, NY 10023

212-310-6600

Central Park, South Entrance
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
Central Park E
New York, NY 10019

(212) 360-1311

Belvedere Castle
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
79th St
New York, NY 10021

(212) 772-0210

Belvedere Castle is a folly in Central Park in Manhattan, New York City. It contains exhibit rooms and an observation deck, and since 1919, the folly has also been the location of the official Central Park weather station.Belvedere Castle was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux in the late 1800s. An architectural hybrid of Gothic and Romanesque styles, Vaux's design called for a more weighty Manhattan schist and granite structure with a corner tower with conical cap, with the existing lookout over parapet walls between them. To reduce costs it was revised in November 1870, and completed under the new Tammany Hall regime as an open painted-wood pavilion.Belvedere means "beautiful view" or "panoramic view" in Italian.DesignBelvedere Castle was originally built as a shell with open doorway and window openings. Starting in 1919, it housed the New York Meteorological Observatory, which had been taken over by the United States Weather Bureau in 1912. The current weather station in Central Park, an Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS), is located immediately south of the castle, though wind equipment is still located on the main tower. The two fanciful wooden pavilions deteriorated without painting and upkeep and were removed before 1900.

Alice in Wonderland Statue in Central Park
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
East Side at 75th St
New York, NY 10021

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Central Park West, Manhattan, New York
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
107 centralpark west
New York, NY 10023

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Strawberry Fields
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
72nd St Entrance at Central Park West
New York, NY 10023

(646) 862-0997 Ext 36

Located near Central Park West between 71st and 74th Streets, Strawberry Fields is a 2.5 acre area of Central Park that pays tribute to the late Beatle, John Lennon, singer, songwriter, musician and peace activist. John Lennon and his wife Yoko Ono lived in the Dakota Apartments adjacently located to this area of the park. It was here, walking into his home, on December 8, 1980, that John Lennon was murdered and shot dead. To commemorate his life, talents and memory, on March 26, 1981, City Council Member Henry J. Stern designated this area, the couple's favorite in Central Park, as Strawberry Fields. Named after the title of the Beatles' song "Strawberry Fields Forever," the teardrop shaped region was re-landscaped by the Central Park Conservancy with the help of landscape architect Bruce Kelley and a generous $1 million donation from Yoko Ono. Visit Strawberry Fields on one of our Central Park horse and carriage tours, bike tours, pedicab tours, or walking tours. The iconic black and white Imagine mosaic, designed by a team of artists from the Italian city of Naples, lies in the center of Strawberry Fields. Named after another famous song by John Lennon, "Imagine" evokes a vision and hope for a world without strife, war and conflict. Additionally, there is a bronze plaque that lists the more than 120 countries that planted flowers and donated money for the maintenance of the area; they have also endorsed Strawberry Fields as a Garden of Peace. Quiet Zone (dogs are prohibited; no running, rollerblading, or bike riding; no organized, active recreation or sports allowed; headphones required for radios)

Central Park Bandshell
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
The Mall, Central Park
New York, NY

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Central Park Carousel
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
65th St
New York, NY 10021

(212) 439-6900

The Central Park Carousel, officially the Michael Friedsam Memorial Carousel, but referred to as the Trump Carousel, is a vintage carousel located in Central Park in Manhattan, New York City, at the southern end of the park, near East 65th Street. It is the fourth carousel in the park since 1871, all located at the same site, and is part of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission's Central Park Scenic Landmark.Installed in the park in 1951 with a new structure surrounding it, it is one of the largest merry-go-rounds in the United States, and was made by Solomon Stein and Harry Goldstein in 1908. It was originally installed in the trolley terminal in Coney Island in Brooklyn, where it operated until the 1940s.The original 1871 Central Park carousel was powered by a mule or horse under the carousel's platform, signaled to start and stop by the operator tapping his foot. Two succeeding rides were destroyed by fires in 1924 and 1950. The current carousel, which was restored in 1990, has 57 hand-carved horses - 52 jumpers and 5 standers - and two chariots. It is open seven days a week when weather permits, and serves around 250,000 riders every year. The carousel has a Ruth & Sohn band organ playing waltzes, marches, and polkas.2010 Lease to Donald TrumpIn 2010, the City evicted the previous tenant who managed the Carousel and the Trump Organization, a prominent New York City conglomerate headed by public figure Donald J. Trump, stepped in as the new tenant. In return for a lease until 2020, Trump promised to invest $400,000 in renovations over ten years and pay a yearly lease that started at $250,000 and scaled up to $325,000. In statements released as part of the Trump presidential campaign, the Carousel grossed $1.72 million between 2013 and the end of 2015. The Trump Organization has also managed the nearby Wollman Rink on and off since 1987.

Rumsey Playfield - Central Park
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
E 69th St & 5th Ave
New York, NY 10021

Central Park, New York, NYC
Distance: 0.0 mi Competitive Analysis
472 Central Park W
New York, NY 10025-3317

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Bethesda Terrace, Central Park
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
Mid-Park at 72nd St
New York, NY 10023

(212) 310-6600

Central Park Carousel
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
65th St Transverse Rd
New York, NY 10023

(212) 439-6900

Shakespeare in the Park (New York City)
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
81st St
New York, NY 10024

(212) 539-8500

Shakespeare in the Park is a theatrical program that stages productions of Shakespearean plays at an open theater in New York City's Central Park. The theater and the productions are managed by the Public Theater and tickets are distributed free of charge on the day of the performance. Originally branded as the New York Shakespeare Festival under the direction of Joseph Papp, the institution was renamed in 2002 as part of a larger reorganization by the Public Theater.HistoryThe festival was originally conceived by director-producer Joseph Papp in 1954. Papp began with a series of Shakespeare workshops, then moved on to free productions on the Lower East Side. Eventually, the plays moved to a lawn in front of Turtle Pond in Central Park. In 1959, parks commissioner Robert Moses demanded that Papp and his company charge a fee for the performances to cover the cost of "grass erosion." A court battle ensued. Papp continued to fight Moses, winning his enduring respect and the quote "well, let's build the bastard a theater." Following this, Moses requested funds from the city for the construction of an amphitheater in the park. In 1961, the Delacorte Theater was built. The first performance held in the theater in 1962 was Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, starring George C. Scott and James Earl Jones.

Sheep Meadow, Central Park - NYC
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
3100 23rd St
New York, NY 10023

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Tourist Attraction Near Central Park

Central Park Zoo
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
64th Street and Fifth Ave
New York, NY 10021

(212) 439-6500

Central Park
Distance: 0.0 mi Competitive Analysis
59th St to 110th St (5th Ave to Central Park West)
New York, NY 10029

(212) 310-6600

Strawberry Fields
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
72nd St Entrance at Central Park West
New York, NY 10021

(646) 862-0997 Ext 36

Strawberry Fields is a 2.5-acre (1.0 ha) landscaped section in New York City's Central Park that is dedicated to the memory of former Beatle John Lennon. It is named after the Beatles' song "Strawberry Fields Forever" written by Lennon. __notoc__DescriptionDesignThe Central Park memorial was designed by Bruce Kelly, the chief landscape architect for the Central Park Conservancy. Strawberry Fields was dedicated on what would have been Lennon's 45th birthday, October 9, 1985, by New York Mayor Ed Koch and Lennon's widow Yoko Ono, who had underwritten the project. The entrance to the memorial is located on Central Park West at West 72nd Street, directly across from the Dakota Apartments, where Lennon had lived for the latter part of his life, and where he was murdered in 1980. The memorial is a triangular piece of land falling away on the two sides of the park, and its focal point is a circular pathway mosaic of inlaid stones, with a single word, the title of Lennon's famous song: "Imagine". This was a gift from the city of Naples, Italy. Along the borders of the area surrounding the mosaic are benches which are endowed in memory of other individuals and maintained by the Central Park Conservancy. Along a path toward the southeast, a plaque on a low glaciated outcropping of schist lists the nations which contributed to building the memorial. Yoko Ono, who still lives in The Dakota, contributed over a million dollars for the landscaping and the upkeep endowment.

Ed Sullivan Theater
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
1697--1699 Broadway
New York, NY 10019

(212) 975-4321

The Ed Sullivan Theater, located at 1697–1699 Broadway between West 53rd and West 54th, in the Theater District in Manhattan, is a venerable radio and television studio in New York City. The theater has been used as a venue for live and taped CBS broadcasts since 1936.It is historically known as the home of The Ed Sullivan Show and the site of The Beatles' US debut performance. It has also housed David Letterman's tenure of CBS' Late Show from 1993 to 2015. The theatre currently houses The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, the second incarnation of the Late Show franchise. It is on the National Register of Historic Places, and the interior has been designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.First 66 yearsThe 13-story, brown brick and terra cotta office building with a ground-floor theater was designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp. It was built by Arthur Hammerstein between 1925 and 1927, and was named Hammerstein's Theatre after his father, Oscar Hammerstein I. The original neo-Gothic interior contained pointed-arch stained-glass windows with scenes from the elder Hammerstein's operas. Its first production was the three-hour musical Golden Dawn, the second male lead of which was Cary Grant, then still using his birth name, Archie Leach. Arthur Hammerstein went bankrupt in 1931, and lost ownership of the building.

Strawberry Fields, Central Park
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
Central Park West (near W 72nd St)
New York, NY 10023

212-310-6600

Bethesda Fountain
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
14 E 60th St
New York, NY 10024

212-310-6600

LOVE Sculpture
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
Southeast corner of W 55th Street and 6th Avenue (Avenue of the Americas)
New York, NY 10019

59th Street – Columbus Circle (New York City Subway)
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
Intersection of West 59th Street, Eighth Ave & Broadway, New York, NY 10023
New York, NY 10023

59th Street–Columbus Circle is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line and the IND Eighth Avenue Line. It is the seventh busiest station complex in the system. It is located at Columbus Circle in Midtown Manhattan where 59th Street, Broadway and Eighth Avenue intersect, and is served by the: 1, A, and D trains at all times C train at all times except late nights B train during weekdays until 11:00 p.m. 2 train during late nightsStation layoutEntrances and exitsThis station complex has many entrances/exits from the streets. The one at the north end of Columbus Circle leads to the Trump International Hotel and Tower. It has a double wide staircase going down to an intermediate level before another double-wide staircase goes down to fare control, where a now unused token booth and turnstile bank lead to the IND mezzanine as well as the north end of the northbound IRT platform. There is also one elevator from the back of the staircase that goes down to fare control.

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir
Distance: 1.0 mi Competitive Analysis
85th Street to 96th St
New York, NY 10029

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The Broadway Theatre
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
1681 Broadway
New York, NY 10019-5827

The Broadway Theatre is a Broadway theatre located in midtown Manhattan. It has a large seating capacity of 1,761, and unlike most Broadway theaters, it is actually located on Broadway, at number 1681.Designed by architect Eugene De Rosa for Benjamin S. Moss, it opened as B.S. Moss's Colony Theatre on Christmas Day 1924 as a venue for vaudeville shows and motion pictures. The theater has operated under many names and owners. It was renamed Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, and Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre before becoming a legitimate theater house simply called Broadway Theatre on December 8, 1930. In 1937, known as Ciné Roma, it showed Italian films. For a short time during the 1950s it showed Cinerama films.On November 18, 1928 the first Mickey Mouse cartoon released to the public, Steamboat Willie, debuted at the Colony. Producer Walt Disney returned on November 13, 1940 to debut the feature film Fantasia in Fantasound, an early stereo system.

Alice in Wonderland Statue in Central Park
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
East Side at 75th St
New York, NY 10021

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The Whitney Museum of American Art
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
945 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10021

(212) 249-4350

The Museum Of Modern Art (Moma) - New York
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
11 W 53rd St
New York, NY 10019

(212) 708-9400

The Dakota Building
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
1 West 72nd St
New York, NY 10023

(212) 362-1448

Hayden Planetarium
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
81 Central Park West
New York, NY 10024

(212) 769-5100

The Empire State Building
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
350 5th Ave
New York, NY 10118

(212) 736-3100

Central Park, New York, NYC
Distance: 0.0 mi Competitive Analysis
472 Central Park W
New York, NY 10025-3317

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The Big Piano at FAO Schwarz
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
767 5th Avenue @ 58th St
New York, NY 10153

4849479610

Bethesda Terrace, Central Park
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
Mid-Park at 72nd St
New York, NY 10023

(212) 310-6600

Asia Society
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
725 Park Ave
New York, NY 10021

(212) 288-6400

Non-profit organization Near Central Park

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk-Central Park
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
132 W 32nd St
New York, NY 10001

(800) 227-2345

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer is a 5-mile non-competitive walk in Central Park, NY as well as in over 160 locations across the nation. This Facebook page gives you fun and easy online tools to help share your experience with your family, friends and colleagues. Post stories, photos, and fundraising efforts to share with others your reason for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer! Each step you’ll take is personal. And each dollar you raise will help save lives. With your help we can continue to: • Educate and empower men and women to live healthy lives and reduce their risk for breast cancer, and to get screening tests such as mammograms to find breast cancer early, when it is easiest to treat • Provide people facing breast cancer with information, day-to-day help, and emotional support to guide them through every step of their breast cancer experience • Invest in and conduct research that leads to groundbreaking discoveries into breast cancer’s causes and cures • Work with legislators to support laws that help fight breast cancer and help all people get access to screenings and care

Central Park Dance Skaters Association
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
Central Park
New York, NY 10023

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WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT Memberships and donations help us pay for permits, sound equipment, and other essential operating costs necessary to keep the CPDSA Skate Circle rolling. Without your support there is no Skate Circle. For Memberships and Donations, please go to our website: http://www.cpdsa.org/support/

RUN As ONE
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
Central Park
New York, NY 80204

(312) 464-0716

Urban Stages Summer Theater Camp
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
259 W 30th St
New York, NY 10001

(212) 421-1380

Urban Stages' Outreach Program enriches the lives of children and adults by providing opportunities to engage with the arts in schools, libraries and on-stage. Through our Summer Theater Camp, students between the ages 10-14 have the unique opportunity to collaborate with and learn from professional artists at our Off-Broadway theater. For more information about our outreach program and initiatives, please visit http://urbanstages.org/

Columbus Citizens Foundation
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
8 E 69th St
New York, NY 10021

(212) 249-9923

Congregation Shearith Israel - The Spanish & Portuguese Synagogue
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
2 W 70th St
New York, NY 10023

(212) 873-0300

Congregation Shearith Israel, the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue, was founded in 1654 by 23 Jews of Spanish and Portuguese descent. It was the first Jewish congregation to be established in North America. Today, Jews of all backgrounds make up our welcoming, traditional community.

The Skirball Center for Adult Jewish Learning at Temple Emanu-El
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
1 E 65th St
New York, NY 10065

(212) 570-9580

HUGS USA
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
P.O. BOX 1754
New York, NY 10101

(646) 856-1014

HUGS are distributed through community organizations, churches and temples, shelters and missions. In emergency situations such as Hurricane Sandy, relief organizations will also be utilized. Wherever there's a need, we'll be providing HUGS. Besides working with homeless, the Hats, Umbrellas, Gloves, and Scarves that we collect from wonderfully generous folks like you are distributed through a partnership with an admirable organization called Project Find. This organization was established to provide low-income and homeless seniors with services and support so that they can live independently. Project Find operates five Senior Centers which serve over 3,000 people and three residences that house 600 people. For more information about Project Find, visit their website, www.projectfind.org. Please help us provide as many HUGS as possible to the homeless, the elderly and the needy by donating today

The Foundation for Education in Honduras
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
P.O. Box 1702
New York, NY 10150

What makes us different? - Apolitical & non-religious organization focused on educational equality in Honduras - 100% volunteer-based organization to ensure the funds reach the children directly - Supplies sourced through local Honduran businesses to promote economic growth in the community - Recent partnership with the Clinton Global Initiative to extend impact and outreach - Cross-Cultural initiatives that enable Honduran students and U.S. students to engage, learn from, and inspire one another

Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
P.O. Box 7307
New York, NY 10116-7307

BECA (Bilingual Education for Central America)
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
P.O. Box 7400
New York, NY 10150

(646) 820-2322

Sojourn Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
PO BOX 1558
New York, NY 10276

New York Abortion Access Fund
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
FDR Station, Box 7569
New York, NY 10150

(212) 252-4757

Eleni's Pop of Color
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
PO Box 1057
New York, NY 10156

Eleni's Pop of Color ("EPOC") is a non-profit outreach program providing scarves to patients undergoing active chemotherapy treatment. EPOC was born out of a desire to provide those enduring the difficulties of chemotherapy with a little bit of comfort in very uncomfortable times. The program was first conceived by Eleni Vavas, a physician, wife, mother, daughter, sister and most importantly a self-proclaimed "cancer fighter". As Eleni persevered through chemo treatments, she struggled with the realities of the side effects that chemotherapy caused. Eleni started wearing scarves, mostly around her neck to cover her mediport, draw people's attention away from her short hair, provide a bit of extra warmth as she struggled to maintain her weight and most importantly as she put it "to add a little pop of color". She always said that she was comforted by how the scarves made her feel. While undergoing treatments, Eleni began working with hospital administrators at North Shore University Hospital to create EPOC. It was Eleni's desire that others going through chemotherapy would be able to enjoy that same bit of comfort she felt when she wrapped herself in those scarves. To continue Eleni’s legacy and vision, EPOC continues its outreach within the North Shore/LIJ Health System. An EPOC scarf is much more than just an accessory. It serves as a badge of honor and as a reminder of the unbreakable human spirit and unwavering strength of the soul within. Almost equally as important is the hope that each EPOC scarf will inspire discussions and promote awareness. *EPOC is sponsored by The Eleni Vavas Memorial Fund which received tax exempt status 501 (c)(3) in September 2015.

New York City Atheists
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
NYC ATHEISTS P.O. BOX 6060
New York, NY 10150-6060

(212) 330-6794

Partnerships for Parks
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
830 5th Ave
New York, NY 10065

(212) 360-1310

City Parks Foundation
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
830 5th Ave
New York, NY 10065

(212) 360-1399

City Parks Foundation (CPF) is the only independent, nonprofit organization to offer park programs throughout the five boroughs of New York City. We work in over 350 parks citywide, presenting a broad range of free arts, sports, and education programs, and empowering citizens to support their parks on a local level. Our programs and community building initiatives reach more than 425,000 people each year, contributing to the revitalization of neighborhoods throughout New York City.

The Kosciuszko Foundation
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
15 E 65th St
New York, NY 10065

(212) 734-2130

The Kosciuszko Foundation: The American Center of Polish Culture Founded in 1925 by Stephen Mizwa, the Kosciuszko Foundation promotes closer ties between Poland and the United States through educational, scientific and cultural exchanges. It awards up to $1 million annually in fellowships and grants to graduate students, scholars, scientists, professionals, and artists, and promotes Polish culture in America. The Foundation has awarded scholarships and provided a forum to Poles who have changed history. Over the years the Kosciuszko Foundation has added honorary trustees to its board, such as Zbigniew Brzezinski, Czeslaw Milosz, Andrzej Wajda, Krzysztof Penderecki, and also provided medals of recognition to people such as Artur Rubinstein, Norman Davies, Ryszard Kapuscinski, Rafal Olbinski, Dr. Maria Siemionow, and other distinguished Poles who have performed or lectured at the foundation. This elaborate network has been part of the foundation's success. Young Poles and Polish-Americans are uniquely poised to change the world, not just through humanities and the arts, but through the sciences, technology, and business as well. But it takes money to finance their dreams through education. With scholarships, they can become the leaders of tomorrow. For the 21st century, the Kosciuszko Foundation wants to build on the examples set by Kosciuszko and Mizwa, but we need your help to do it. The Kosciuszko Foundation can only continue its activities supporting Polish culture and awarding scholarships if we receive support from people like you. To donate to the Kosciuszko Foundation in the United States in New York, call (212) 734 2130, or visit us on the web at http://www.thekf.org

JNF Greater New York
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
42 E 69th St
New York, NY 10021

Council on Foreign Relations
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
58 E 68th St
New York, NY 10065

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CFR carries out its mission by --maintaining a diverse membership; --convening meetings at its headquarters in New York and in Washington, DC, and other cities; --supporting a Studies Program that fosters independent research; --sponsoring Independent Task Forces that produce reports with both findings and policy prescriptions on the most important foreign policy topics; and --providing up-to-date information and analysis about world events and American foreign policy on its website, CFR.org.