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West Hollywood Gateway, West Hollywood CA | Nearby Businesses


7100 Santa Monica Blvd Ste 70
West Hollywood, CA 90046

(323) 785-2560

This extraordinary shopping center houses arguably the most popular Target in the nation where celebrities and the Hollywood elite shop on a regular basis. The center also includes Best Buy, BevMo and Ulta as well as numerous restaurants such as Mendocino Farms, Hot N Juicy Crawfish and LYFE Kitchen plus many more shops and amenities. Your gateway to a good time. Kick back in the courtyard in the shadow of the Hollywood sign and see the cross-section of celebrity and shopping with a West Hollywood twist! Managed by Colliers International

Public Places and Attractions Near West Hollywood Gateway

Hollywood Walk of Fame
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
6801 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028

(323) 469-8311

Get the scoop, updates, join in the conversation, hear it first at our official Walk of Fame page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hollywood-Walk-of-Fame/107930052586317

Madame Tussauds Hollywood
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
6933 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028

(323) 798-1670

At Madame Tussauds you can see, touch and take photos with all of your favorite celebrities! We've taken down the museum-style ropes and poles so that YOU can get up-close and personal with Hollywood's biggest A-listers. Sit down for breakfast with Audrey Hepburn, dance with Patrick Swayze, ride a bike with everyone's favorite Extraterrestrial friend E.T., be serenaded by Demi Lovato, and shoot hoops with Kobe Bryant. With over 125 figures, there is something for everyone! We offer group rates! For group bookings, please call 323-798-1681. Open on Christmas and New Year's Day

Hollywood Blvd.
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028

Hollywood Wax Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
6767 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90028
Los Angeles, CA 90028

The Hollywood Wax Museum is a wax museum featuring replicas of celebrities located on Hollywood Boulevard in the tourist district in Hollywood, California.OverviewThe museum, brainchild of entrepreneur Spoony Singh, opened on February 25, 1965, and claims in promotional literature to be the only wax museum dedicated solely to celebrities. It is the longest-running wax museum in the United States.When Singh opened the Hollywood Wax Museum, the line to get in was 1/2 mile long. The former sawmill operator from Canada built the Museum's fame by befriending celebrities, gossip columnists, members of the foreign press association and fans.After Singh's retirement, his sons and grandson have continued to own, operate and further the Hollywood Wax Museum's legacy. In June 2012, the family was recognized as Heroes of Hollywood by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce Community Foundation for their staunch and generous support of the Hollywood community.In popular cultureThe Hollywood Wax Museum has appeared in the following movies and TV shows: The Mechanic (1972), Wes Craven's Cursed (2005), and America's Next Top Model (2007). The Hollywood Wax Museum is also featured on the video game, Midnight Club: Los Angeles.LocationThe Hollywood Wax Museum building once housed the most exclusive hangout in Los Angeles: The Embassy Club. It is on Hollywood Blvd, near Highland Ave.

Wax Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
6767 Hollywood Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90028-4623

323-462-5991

The Magic Castle
Distance: 1.0 mi Competitive Analysis
7001 Franklin Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90028

The Magic Castle, located at 7001 Franklin Avenue in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles, California, is a nightclub for magicians and magic enthusiasts, as well as the clubhouse for the Academy of Magical Arts. It bills itself as "the most unusual private club in the world."Country Club of MagicThe Magic Castle is a performance venue, restaurant and private club. A typical evening features several magic and sometimes variety arts performances, as well as a full service dining room and several bars in a country club atmosphere. A dress code of formal party attire is strictly enforced. Entry is only allowed to members and their guests.The lobby of the Castle has no visible doors to the interior, and visitors must say a secret phrase to a sculpture of an owl to gain access, exposing the entrance to the club. Magicians perform in several different theaters, including the intimate Close-up Gallery, a larger Parlour of Prestidigitation, and the large stage in the Palace of Mystery. Nightly, five different magic performances are showcased in these three different theaters, and on weekends additional performances are added in the Peller theatre as well as Hat and Hare Pub and W.C. Fields Bar. Informal performance areas near the five bars give magician members the space for impromptu magic for guests and other patrons. In the music room, a piano is played by invisible "Irma," the Castle's "resident ghost," who takes musical requests.In addition, there are regular Houdini Séances at the castle in the Houdini Seance room, conducted by Leo Kostka, Rob Zabrecky, or Misty Lee.

Hollywood Walk of Fame
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028

This is the only official page of the Hollywood Walk of Fame administered by the Hollywood Chamber's Stargirl, producer of the Walk of Fame. Also follow Stargirl on Twitter at @WOFstargirl.

Enigma escape rooms
Distance: 1.0 mi Competitive Analysis
7805 W Sunset Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90046

(323) 770-3101

Hancock Park
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
505 N La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90036

Rodeo Drive, Beverley Hills
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
Rodeo Drive
Beverly Hills, CA 90068

Roselvelt Holtel
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
7000 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028

(323) 856-1970

Crossroads of the World
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
6671 W Sunset Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028

(323) 463-5611

Crossroads of the World has been called America's first outdoor shopping mall. Located on Sunset Boulevard and Las Palmas in Los Angeles, the mall features a central building designed to resemble an ocean liner surrounded by a small village of cottage-style bungalows. It was designed by Robert V. Derrah and built in 1936.Once a busy shopping center, the Crossroads now hosts private offices, primarily for the entertainment industry. It has been used for location shooting in many films, including L.A. Confidential, The Adventures of Ford Fairlane, and ''Café Society, in TV shows, including Dragnet and Remington Steele, and in commercials by McDonald's, Ford, and Mattel. A reproduction of Crossroads' iconic tower and spinning globe can be seen just inside the entrance to Disney's Hollywood Studios at Walt Disney World in Florida.Today, Crossroads is the creative home of a variety of music publishers and producers, television and film script writers, film and recording companies, novelists, costume designers, publicists, and casting agencies.

Michael Jackson's Star
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
6927 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028

Hollywood History Museum
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
1660 N Highland Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90028-6121

(323) 464-7776

Henson Recording Studio
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
1416 N La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90028-7506

(323) 856-6680

Chevra Kadisha Mortuary
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
7832 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90046-5303

(323) 653-8886

Whitley Court
Distance: 1.1 mi Competitive Analysis
1720-1728 1/2 Whitley Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90028

(323) 469-0491

Whitley Court is a cluster of Spanish Colonial bungalows built from 1903 to 1919 just north of Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California.The first structure, built in 1903, was a two-story Colonial Revival house with a round bay turret designed by Dennis & Farwell for the Whitley family. The original house was moved to the back of the property to make room for four additional two-story residential buildings. The buildings provided housing for those employed in the booming film industry, and its residents are rumored to have included Theda Bara in the 1920s and Sylvia Sidney in the 1930s.In 1974, the buildings were converted to a mix of residential and office space. During the 1992 Los Angeles riots, fires burned just 150 feet from Whitley Court, but residents protected the structures with hoses. At the time, one of the owners said, "These buildings are important. You can't replace a historic building. When it burns, you lose it forever."Whitley Court was designated a Historic Cultural Monument (HCM #448) by the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission in 1988, and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2004.

Freeman House
Distance: 1.2 mi Competitive Analysis
1962 Glencoe Way
Los Angeles, CA 90068-3113

(323) 851-0671

Moments - The Grove
Distance: 1.6 mi Competitive Analysis
189 The Grove Dr
Los Angeles, CA 90036

(818) 703-0491

Guaranty Building (Hollywood, California)
Distance: 1.2 mi Competitive Analysis
6331 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028

Guaranty Building is a Beaux Arts office building in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California built in 1923 and designed by John C. Austin. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. The building is currently owned by the Church of Scientology.

Shopping/Retail Near West Hollywood Gateway

Designers Views
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
1028 N La Brea Ave
West Hollywood, CA 90038

(323) 463-1818

Please forward story links to your friends, and encourage them to like this page -- that will ensure you get the latest updates about new arrivals, sales and more! Follow us on Twitter! https://twitter.com/DesignersViews

Best Buy Mobile West Hollywood
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
1015 N La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038

(323) 883-0219

Max & Moritz: a not so general store
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
7209 Santa Monica Blvd
West Hollywood, CA 90046

(323) 851-2200

BLU HOLE
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
N La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Studio Depot
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
12154 Montague St
Pacoima, CA 91331

(323) 851-0111

With over 14,000 studio items, and union/student discounts it's no wonder we're number #1 in Hollywood expendables! Don't believe us? Check out our new location, and follow us on twitter and instagram! We know you'll love us as much as we love this industry, and that includes you.

Church Boutique
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
7277 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90046

(323) 876-8887

Get on our mailing list for latest updates: http://eepurl.com/dCQLQ https://twitter.com/churchboutique http://churchboutique.tumblr.com/ http://pinterest.com/churchboutique/ http://instagram.com/churchboutique

Jet Rag
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
825 N La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038

(323) 939-0528

Kitson Outlet
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
6836 Lexington Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038

(310) 882-6316

Beach Deliveries
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
1335 N La Brea Ave
West Hollywood, CA 90028

(818) 245-5399

Hidden Treasure Way
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
1335 N La Brea Ave, Ste 2109
Los Angeles, CA 90028

(310) 634-6366

After the success of their upstart eBay resale business, owners Nick and Courtney decided to independently open their own online antiques and luxury clothing resale boutique in August 2014. Hidden Treasure Way strives to provide a special selection of not only the finest in designer, luxury, rare and vintage men's, women's and children's clothing and accessories, but also a curated assortment of antiques, accents and "treasures" for the home, representing the owners' joint passions. Each item at Hidden Treasure Way is hand picked by Nick and Courtney ensuring authenticity, utmost quality and aesthetic appeal! Nick's background is in real estate, while Courtney is educated and professionally trained in art history and appraisal. Both owners happily reside in Los Angeles, California. At Hidden Treasure Way, we are continuously adding more inventory, so please check back weekly on our instagram! We are currently accepting consignments in both antiques/housewares and clothing/accessories. Please be sure to inquire within about our consignment terms, and subscribe to our newsletter. We hope you enjoy your journey down Hidden Treasure Way!

Humble Yogini Tea Co
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
1317 N Orange Dr
Los Angeles, CA 90028

(213) 422-5846

Dear Friends, Thank you for your purchase of Humble Yogini Tea. In doing so we as a collective are supporting a fair wage, health care, day care and schools for the growers, pickers, and their families. We are also supporting sustainable farming by purchasing tea from Sri Lanka, who as country, has made a commitment to the world to be one of the first tea producing countries to not use any chemicals that will affect the ozone including no use of herbicides. Thus teas from Sri Lanka are so clean that they are one of the few tea producing countries that are imported in Japan. It is my great pleasure to provide this beautiful cup of tea from my heart to yours. Please stop by our online tea store http://www.hyteaco.com/

Hollywood Gym Nutrition
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
1551 N La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90028

JVB Interiors
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
729 N La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038

(323) 935-4444

Blackman Cruz
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
836 N Highland Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038

(323) 466-8600

Blackman Cruz specializes in extraordinary objects—the rare, the magnificent, the provocative, and the eccentric—in all their many forms. Their collection of furniture and decorative objects spans several centuries, many different styles of design, and a wide range of countries, from America and Mexico to Italy and France and beyond. Instead of period or pedigree, a particular aesthetic sensibility unites the showroom’s far-flung array of antiques and contemporary production pieces. Blackman Cruz’s approach to great design celebrates the virtues of drama, humor, ingenuity, and sculptural brio. Adam Blackman and David Cruz founded the company in 1993 as a resource for adventurous collectors and designers who share their passion for exceptional, idiosyncratic furniture and accessories. They filled the original showroom on La Cienega Boulevard with a heady mix of vintage treasures and alluring, offbeat curiosities from around the world. The partners soon began to complement the antiques with sympathetic contemporary objects of their own design, produced under the Blackman Cruz Workshop imprimatur. They cultivated their reputation as specialists in the exotic with signature pieces such as their bronze Op Table, Tri Ball Lamp and bronze Skull Lamp. By 2000, the BC Workshop collection had grown to encompass more than 50 pieces, ranging from chairs and tables to mirrors and lamps. Collaboration with artists has always been an important part of the work of Blackman Cruz. The BC Workshop collection includes sculpture and furniture designed exclusively for the company by artists Kathleen O’Keefe, Jeff Price, Alison Berger, and Lika Moore, Senior Designer at Blackman Cruz. Recently, the Blackman Cruz product mix has expanded into jewelry, with a range of exclusive pieces created by Pamela Park Proctor and Beth Orduna. In September of 2008, after fifteen years on La Cienega, the trendsetting shop moved its collection of dazzling curiosities into a much grander cabinet on Highland Avenue. Nearly triple the size of its original space, the new Blackman Cruz occupies the former home of the Probe, a gay bar popular in the 1970s and ’80s. The owners have maximized the dramatic potential of the vast-double space by installing monumental attractions and expanding the scope of their overall product offering.

Gift Baskets for Gays
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
N Vista Street, 90046
Los Angeles, CA 90046

(323) 775-3284

Trying to find the perfect gift for a gay friend was always an impossible task. From the most basic interests to the most stereotypical, we could never find anything that was a perfect fit! This is how 'Gift Baskets for Gays' was born! We are going to take all the hassle out of assembling a gift basket for your friends, boyfriends and husbands and will promise to offer 'Gift Baskets Fit for a Queen.' Founded by two gay men here in West Hollywood, one of the Gay capitals of the West, we have taken the homosexual stereotype to the furthest levels and offer you baskets for every taste and every occasion. We have taken the greatest of pleasures in sourcing an array of productions from around the globe that come together to titillate, delight, arouse and stimulate the senses. We make no apologoy for the adult nature of some of our baskets, as gay men ourselves it is not our intention to offend anyone.

Hollywood Hatters
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
6905 Melrose Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038

(323) 525-1912

The Window
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
6825 Melrose Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038

(323) 939-6909

Necromance Hollywood
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
7222 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046
Los Angeles, CA 90046

(323) 934-8684

Selling natural history items, including mounted butterflies & insects, sea shells & other sea life, animal & human bones & skeletons, feathers, horns & antlers. Along with antique, vintage,& contemporary jewelry, oddities, funerary items & mourning jewelry, vintage & antique medical collectibles, antique prints and postcards, realistic resin human skulls, and vintage cameras.

The Never Open Store
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
707 N Poinsettia Pl
Los Angeles, CA 90046

(323) 641-2147

Little shop of horrible hours Stephanie Mata's Never Open Store offers quirky items to those who can get in. December 12, 2009|By Bob Pool Los Angeles Times The Never Open Store is open only when Mata feels like unlocking it and allowing shoppers inside. Those who do get in are intrigued by the merchandise that fills every cranny of the 245-square-foot shop. Collectibles, eclectic art assemblages and funky antiques are crammed onto tables and shelves and hang from the walls and ceiling. Fanciful clothing and accessories are draped in any leftover space. "I pick who I want to come in here. I basically choose my clientele," said Mata, 47. "People put their noses to the glass windows to look inside and see if anyone's here. I can hear them asking each other why this place isn't ever open. They wonder how they can get in." When she is working in the store -- gluing odd pairings of items such as toys and ceramics together or customizing a battered picture frame for assemblages she creates -- Mata doesn't want to be distracted by paying customers. "I say 'no' with tact and grace. I'll tell them I'm cleaning and the shop isn't open," she said. "My store hours are hit or miss." A few moments later, Alexandra Guaderrama timidly poked her head inside the Never Open Store. "I saw the door open. I've lived up the street for a year and this is the first time I've seen this place open," the Cal State Northridge screenwriting student said. "It's amazing. The stuff here is random, eccentric, artistic. Some of the things are weird, but it works. It's perfect for Hollywood." Mata introduced herself as the owner. "I love your place," Guaderrama told her. "But why are you so rarely open?" Mata explained her philosophy as she checked the size of a green satin vintage cocktail dress that Guaderrama was admiring. "I'm the boss, and I don't like bad vibes," she said. Guaderrama commented on a dartboard that was riddled by labeled syringes, some bearing the names of deceased celebrities, and on a handbag decorated with tiny liquor bottles and an Alcoholics Anonymous emblem. "She gets it," Mata said, nodding. Like her policy with customers, Mata's prices are arbitrary, too. "Nothing in here is marked. I basically size people up. I know it's unethical, but it's based on what I feel -- whether I think they really love the item." She recognizes when studio set designers with a substantial budget to spend come in and charges them accordingly when they need a funky piece of artwork or a hip knickknack for the background of a scene. Young people decorating their first apartment on a budget are likely to catch more of a break. The green satin dress would be priced at $125, Mata said; the dartboard $75 and the handbag $125. Guaderrama left empty-handed but promised to return. The most expensive thing Mata has sold was a "cool chandelier I found on the side of the road" that went for $1,500. The cheapest items are $20 stainless steel fortune cookies. She bought a box filled with them at a clearance sale she happened upon in Northern California. Mata prowls garage and yard sales and thrift shops looking for one-of-a-kind items. "I usually like things that other people don't like. It's almost psychic -- spooky -- how things find me," she said. She has several "routes" that she travels on the lookout for castoff treasures on the nights before trash pickup day. Mata makes the loop about 1:30 a.m., after she finishes her shift working the door at local clubs such as the Roxy. Her longtime career as a professional doorwoman helps give her the financial independence to be picky about customers at her store, she said. It also has taught her how to politely tell them, "No, you can't come in." Her nighttime curb searching often pays off. "You'd be so surprised what people throw away. There are some amazing things. And the books that thrift shops throw out. It's heartbreaking. Sometimes I'll take the books and just leave them for people on a corner in a poor neighborhood." Mata's husband of 18 years, musician Dave Gibney, and their 15-year-old daughter, Molly, do not share her love of recycling, she said. They live in an apartment above another shop that is next to the Never Open Store. "When I find something on the street, they cross to the other side and pretend they don't know me," she said with a laugh. Mata decided to open her business eight years ago when her collection of objects d'art outgrew their living quarters. Her small storefront, built in 1929 at 707 N. Poinsettia Place, formerly housed a poodle grooming business and, later, a tiny art gallery. Both the merchandising and the nightclub door work come naturally for Mata. She was born in Las Vegas to a pair of designers who ran a clothing store that catered to such customers as the musicians and actors who made up the famed "Rat Pack." When she was 8 her family moved to Los Angeles, where she said her father worked with singers Bobby Darin and Tony Bennett. Her first husband was a musician who played in local clubs and that is where "somebody asked, 'Steph, can you do the door?' " and her nightclub career was launched, she said. Besides keeping the size of the crowd at the correct occupancy level, she turns away those who are underage, intoxicated or "are weirdos," as she puts it. For 18 years, starting in the 1980s, she held a series of daytime jobs in shops and boutiques on Melrose Avenue. "I did arrangements and design work without being compensated," Mata said. "I finally decided I might as well not get compensated at my own shop." She says she is comfortable as a merchant because her rent is reasonable and the income from her club "night gig," as she calls it, is reliable. So the Never Open Store remains open. Even as some shops on Melrose Avenue struggle to stay that way.