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United States Customhouse and Post Office, St. Louis MO | Nearby Businesses


815 Olive Street
St. Louis, MO 63101

(314) 436-4999

The U.S. Custom House and Post Office is a court house in St. Louis, Missouri.It was designed by architects Alfred B. Mullett, William Appleton Potter, and James G. Hill, and was constructed between 1873 and 1884. Located at the intersection of Eighth and Olive Streets, it is one of four surviving Federal office buildings designed by Mullett. The others are the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, D.C., the Century Post Office in Raleigh, N.C. and the U.S. Custom House in Portland, Me. It is in the Second Empire architectural style popular in the post Civil-War era. Mullett's other Second Empire buildings in Boston, Cincinnati, New York City and Philadelphia have been demolished.DescriptionThe three-story monumental granite building is 234ft long and 179ft deep. It includes a basement, sub-basement and attic level, with 16ft ceilings at the basement levels and 10ft thick foundation walls, which are surrounded by a 25ft deep dry moat for light and ventilation. The basement connects to a tunnel under 8th Street that was used for the delivery of mail to the post office. The basement material is red Missouri granite, while the upper floors are gray granite from Hurricane Island, Maine, between 3ft and 4ft in thickness. The building surrounds a skylit inner courtyard, 48ft by 55ft.

Government Organization Near United States Customhouse and Post Office

Soldiers Memorial Military Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
1315 Chestnut St
St. Louis, MO 63103

(314) 746-4599

The initiative to construct a memorial plaza and memorial building to honor the gallant sons and daughters of Missouri, and of our city, who "made the supreme sacrifice in the World War", began in 1923. Over the course of several years, the City of St. Louis and its citizens raised money for the project. Under the leadership of Mayor Bernard F. Dickmann, and with some funds coming from the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works (Project No. 5098), the construction of the building, development of the memorial plaza, and improvements to the parks began on October 21, 1935 and the memorial and museum officially opened on Memorial Day, May 30, 1938. "This magnificent edifice, erected as a perpetual reminder of the valor and sacrifice that has enabled America to live, will spur us on as a people to make America greater. We, who live, because others have died, should make of this shrine a place of love and a monument of peace." - Mayor Bernard F. Dickmann, May 30, 1938 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, came to St. Louis to dedicate the site for the Soldiers Memorial building on October 14, 1936. “…Here will rise a fitting structure—a symbol of devoted patriotism and unselfish service. We in America do not build monuments to war: we do not build monuments to conquests; we build monuments to commemorate the spirit of sacrifice in war—reminders of our desire for peace. The memory of those, whom the war called to the Beyond, urges us to consecrate the best that is in us to the service of country in times of peace. We best honor the memory of those dead by striving for Peace, that the terror of the days of war will be with us no more. May the beauty of this monument, which will rise on this site, cast a beneficent light on the memories of our comrades, may a substantial structure typify the strength of their purpose, and may it inspire future generations with a desire to be of service to their fellows and their country.” Seemingly, the poignancy of the President’s words were not lost on his audience: The quality and pride of craftsmanship, the careful attention to detail and design, confirm the depth of commitment and steadfast appreciation of Great Depression-era St. Louisans for those who served in the armed forces—veterans—and for those who served to the last measure of their lives—who made “The Supreme Sacrifice.” Further, these St. Louisans did not forget the families, understanding that war reaches beyond the battlefield, to the American home, with lasting effect long after peace treaties are signed. Here are a few architectural features to notice the next time you visit Soldiers Memorial. The quoted material is as described in a very early guide book, published by Mason Printing Company, St. Louis: * Exterior walls of the building itself: Of Bedford limestone, from Bedford Indiana. * Outside, looking up, trimming the building just below the second floor balcony: “On the facing of the parapet, surrounding the upper promenade, are carved medallions representing infantrymen, marines, tank operators, sailors and the other divisions of service.” (p. 14) * Outside, large sculptured, limestone figures flanking the stairs: “Four magnificent sculptured stone figures, two on the south side [Chestnut street side], representing Courage [male figure] and Vision [female figure]; two on the north side [Pine street side], representing Loyalty [male figure] and Sacrifice [female figure]. These massive, beautiful figures are the work of Walker Hancock, a native St. Louisan.” (p. 14) * Going up the stairs to the entrance and under the covered atrium area, the Cenotaph: “Of black granite resting upon a base of Bedford stone. Carved upon [the cenotaph] are 1075 names of soldiers and nurses from our city, who made the supreme sacrifice [referring to WWI].” (p.11) * In the covered atrium area, looking up: Gold Star Mother mosaic ceiling: Probably designed and installed by the Ravenna Mosaic Company, St. Louis—the same company that did the mosaics at the Cathedral Basilica on Lindell. Note that lights embedded inside the cenotaph shine upwards onto the ceiling at night—to highlight the detail and color of the tiles. As stated in the Mason Printing guide book: “Large flood lights in the hollowed center of the Cenotaph illuminate the ceiling which is of glass mosaic in red, gold and silver. Centered in the ceiling is a large gold star, dedicated to the mothers of St. Louisans who died in the war.” (p. 11) * Elevator and stairway, located in the west museum lobby, north end and south end, respectively: “Access to the upper part [second floor] of the Memorial is by automatic elevator, which is completely paneled in American Walnut [probably from Missouri]. There is also a magnificent modernistic stairway, the walls of which are napoleon gray marble from Phoenix, MO. The treads and risers are of terrazzo. Modernistic aluminum rails and lighting fixtures create a pleasing and entrancing atmosphere.” (p.17) * Entrance doors and museums: “There are two museums, east and west sides, at the entrance to which are modernistic aluminum light standards. The doors to the museums are made of heavy plate glass, encased in frames of aluminum and alloys that produce a soft, satin silver finish. The floors of the museum[s] are of terrazzo, while the nine-foot wainscoating [in the museums] is of St. Genevieve [Missouri] rose marble, with Belgian blue marble as a trim. The grill work over the doors and the 28-foot windows in the museums is of aluminum.” (p. 15) * Basement area where CEMA offices are currently located: “On the ground floor is the assembly room used by the Gold Star Mothers and other war organizations of women. The assembly room accommodates 300 persons.” (p. 18) Note also that the U.S.O. held events in the basement area before CEMA and before the U.S.O. moved to Lambert Airport. The Soldiers' Memorial was designed by St. Louis architectural firm Mauran, Russell & Crowell, in the Classical style, but with limited ornamentation. Its entrances are flanked by four monumental sculptural groups carved in Bedford stone, representing figures of Loyalty, Vision, Courage and Sacrifice. Created by sculptor Walker Hancock they stand, with their horses, on the North and South sides of the building. Ornamental pylons on the terrace level name major World War I battles in which St. Louisans participated. Inside the building, a 38-foot high ceiling of mosaic tile tops the loggia area. The tiles form a large gold star dedicated to the mothers of St. Louisans who died in wars. A black granite cenotaph in the center of the loggia is inscribed with the names of 1,075 St. Louisans who lost their lives in World War I.

CityGarden In Downtown St. Louis
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
Market St
St. Louis, MO 63101

Civil Court Building
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
10 N Tucker Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63101

314-622-4500

Robert A Young Federal Building
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
1222 Spruce St
St. Louis, MO 63103

City Of St. Louis Justice Center
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
200 S Tucker Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 621-5848

Missouri Circuit Court-22nd Judicial Circuit (St. Louis City)
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
10 N Tucker Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63101

(314) 621-2626

Federal Building
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
1222 Spruce St
St. Louis, MO 63103

(314) 539-7305

St Louis City Municipal Court
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
1520 Market Street, Suite 1120 (Entrance Is on 16th Street)
St. Louis, MO 63103

(314) 622-4168

The St Louis Municipal Court adjudicates violations of local ordinances that summons are issued by St. Louis City Law Enforcement officials for violations occurring within the City of St Louis.

St. Louis Fire Department Engine House # 2
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
314 S. Tucker Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63102

USAF St. Louis MEPS
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
1222 Spruce St
St. Louis, MO 63103

(800) 423-8723

I AM AN AMERICAN AIRMAN. I AM A WARRIOR. I HAVE ANSWERED MY NATION'S CALL. I AM AN AMERICAN AIRMAN. MY MISSION IS TO FLY, FIGHT, AND WIN. I AM FAITHFUL TO A PROUD HERITAGE, A TRADITION OF HONOR, AND A LEGACY OF VALOR. I AM AN AMERICAN AIRMAN, GUARDIAN OF FREEDOM AND JUSTICE, MY NATION'S SWORD AND SHIELD, ITS SENTRY AND AVENGER. I DEFEND MY COUNTRY WITH MY LIFE. I AM AN AMERICAN AIRMAN: WINGMAN, LEADER, WARRIOR. I WILL NEVER LEAVE AN AIRMAN BEHIND, I WILL NEVER FALTER, AND I WILL NOT FAIL.

City Hall 1200 Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
1200 Market St
St. Louis, MO 63103

(314) 622-4800

St. Louis Police Academy
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
315 S Tucker Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 444-5630

St Louis City Hall
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
1200 Market St
St. Louis, MO 63103

(314) 622-3201

St. Louis City Board of Election Commissioners
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
300 N Tucker Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63101

(314) 622-4336

Navy Recruiting District St. Louis
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
1222 Spruce St
St. Louis, MO 63103

(314) 331-5085

Learn more about the Navy: http://www.navy.com http://www.reserve.com http://www.navyformoms.com/ Navy Recruiting Command: www.cnrc.navy.mil Navy Recruiting District St Louis: www.cnrc.navy.mil/stlouis/

U S Government Appeals Court-Eighth Circuit
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
111 S 10th St Suite 2.319
St. Louis, MO 63102-1125

(314) 244-2665

City Of St. Louis Mayors Office
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
http://danaloeschradio.com/st.-louis-mayor-blames-the-second-amendment-for-gun-crime
St. Louis, MO 63103

Circuit Attorney's Office
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
1114 Market St
St. Louis, MO 63101

(314) 622-4941

Follow @stlcao on Twitter for updates from the Circuit Attorney's Office. Follow @JenniferJoyceCA, the personal account of Circuit Attorney Jennifer M. Joyce. Please direct any questions or comments to this e-mail address: [email protected] To see what you can do about gun violence in St. Louis, visit www.StLouisGunCrime.com. Are you concerned about something you saw on social media? Social media is a powerful tool for people to share their thoughts and lifestyles. It’s also a forum where criminals or suspected criminals boast of their illegal activities. So, If you see something on social media that you think is suspicious or something that you think law enforcement should know about, there are things you can do to help. If you think something you see online is a crime, call police and tell them immediately. Examples would be a threat to someone’s safety, plans to commit a crime, solicitation for sex, sexual photos, blackmail, child pornography, and the targeting of the elderly. If you see gang behavior, illegal firearms activity, someone bragging about items taken in a robbery or burglary, or you see someone you know is a suspect or defendant in a case posting illegal activity, let us know. You can leave a message on this website by filling out the information below. You can call 314-612-1411 and leave a voicemail message, or send an email to [email protected] You can also fill out the form at http://www.stlouisguncrime.com/#!takeaction/c1faw. You may leave your contact information, but that is NOT a requirement.

SLATE Missouri Job Center
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
1520 Market St
St. Louis, MO 63103

(314) 589-8000

St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (SLATE), in coordination with the Missouri State Department of Economic Development (DED), Division of Workforce Development (DWD), the City of St. Louis Mayor's office and a number of partners, operates SLATE Missouri Career Centers, which connect employers to a skilled workforce and provide training and placement services to the City's adult workforce.

Wainwright Building St. Louis
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
111 N 7th St
St. Louis, MO 63135

Landmark Near United States Customhouse and Post Office

Marriott St. Louis Grand Hotel
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
800 Washington Ave
St. Louis, MO 63101

(314) 621-9600

The Marriott St. Louis Grand Hotel is located in the Washington Avenue Historic District in Downtown St. Louis, Missouri. The hotel was renovated in 2015HistoryThe Hotel Statler St. Louis was designed by George B. Post & Sons and was built in 1917 as part of the Statler Hotels chain. It was the first air-conditioned hotel in the United States. Statler Hotels was bought by Hilton in 1954, soon after the hotel became The Statler Hilton St. Louis. It was sold to Towne Realty Company of Milwaukee in 1966 and renamed The St. Louis Gateway Hotel. The hotel was sold to Denver businessman Victor Sayyah and St. Louis politician Peter J. Webbe in 1981 for $3.2 million. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. The hotel closed for a renovation in 1986, but caught fire on February 12, 1987 and never reopened. The fire was determined to have been deliberately set.The hotel sat empty for over a decade, until the city government pushed for its renovation as part of a 1000-room hotel to serve the adjacent America's Center. Cleanup work began on the hotel in November 1999 at a cost of $5 million. The hotel was then renovated from 2000 to 2002 by Kimberly-Clark and Historic Restoration Inc. at a cost of $265 million. At this time, a new addition,was constructed to the east. It was originally to have had 38 floors but was eventually reduced to match the height of the existing hotel. The hotel was renamed the Renaissance St. Louis Grand Hotel.

Lennox Hotel
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
823-827 WASHINGTON Ave
St. Louis, MO 63101

The Courtyard St. Louis Downtown/Convention Center is a historic hotel in downtown St. Louis, Missouri. The 25-story hotel opened on September 2, 1929 as the Lennox Hotel and was the tallest hotel in the city upon its opening. Designed by Preston J. Bradshaw in the Renaissance Revival style, the building features terra cotta faces and cornices. The hotel, along with the Hotel Statler and the Mayfair Hotel, was built as part of a commercial boom in downtown St. Louis in the 1920s. It was the last hotel built in the area before the Great Depression, and another hotel did not open in downtown St. Louis until 1963. The Lennox Hotel eventually closed after newer hotels were built in the 1970s. The hotel was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 6, 1984.It was renovated in 2002 and reopened as the Renaissance St. Louis Suites Hotel. The hotel was foreclosed in 2009 by its bondholders after it failed to generate enough revenue to cover interest payments. It closed in November 2011. It was sold in December 2013 to Maritz, Wolff & Co., which spent $15 million on a complete renovation. It reopened on September 2, 2015 as the Courtyard St. Louis Downtown/Convention Center.

Frisco Building
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
906 Olive St
St. Louis, MO 63101

(314) 231-9110

The Frisco Building is a historic office building in downtown St. Louis, Missouri. The building was built in 1903-04 as the headquarters for the St. Louis - San Francisco Railroad, which was also known as the Frisco. The architecture firm Eames and Young designed the building as well as its 1905-06 addition; the building's subtle ornamentation and its pier and spandrel system were both important developments in skyscraper design. The Frisco occupied the building for almost eighty years after its opening, and in that time played an important role in Missouri's economic development through railroad construction.The Frisco Building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 29, 1983.

Wainwright Building
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
111 N 7th St
St. Louis, MO 63101

(314) 340-7590

The Wainwright Building is a 10-story red brick office building at 709 Chestnut Street in downtown St. Louis, Missouri. The Wainwright Building is among the first skyscrapers in the world. It was designed by Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan in the Palazzo style and built between 1890 and 1891. It was named for local brewer, building contractor, and financier Ellis Wainwright.The building, listed as a landmark both locally and nationally, is described as "a highly influential prototype of the modern office building" by the National Register of Historic Places. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright called the Wainwright Building "the very first human expression of a tall steel office-building as Architecture."The building is currently owned by the State of Missouri and houses state offices.In May 2013 it was listed by a PBS program as one of "10 Buildings That Changed America" because it was "the first skyscraper that truly looked the part" with Sullivan being dubbed the "Father of Skyscrapers."

T-REX
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
911 Washington Ave, Suite 500
St. Louis, MO 63101

(314) 241-7500

Cakeway to the West Challenge
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
Search Locations
St. Louis, MO

KwajaMonster's Secret Hideout
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
2468 Who Do We Appreciate
St. Louis, MO 63017

Missouri Athletic Club Building
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
405 Washington Ave
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 231-7220

The Missouri Athletic Club Building, also known as the Missouri Athletic Association Building, is a historic building having Renaissance Revival architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.The building is the headquarters of the Missouri Athletic Club. It is located at 405 Washington Avenue, at the corner of Fourth Street, adjacent to the entrance to the Eads Bridge on the Missouri side. The thirteen-story clubhouse designed by William B. Ittner contains four restaurants, a cigar parlor, a ballroom, a barber shop, numerous private meeting rooms, a reading room, a billiard parlor, a rooftop deck, 80 guest rooms, and full-service athletic facilities. The athletic facilities include weight training, a golf practice room, a pro shop, whirlpools, tanning beds, wet and dry saunas, trainers, pros, a masseuse, squash courts, racquetball courts, and handball courts.

Laclede's Landing station
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
200 Washington Ave
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 231-2345

Laclede's Landing is a St. Louis MetroLink Station. It is located near Laclede's Landing and the Gateway Arch in downtown St. Louis, Missouri. This station is also nearby the headquarters for Metro Transit, the operator of MetroLink and MetroBus. It was one of six MetroLink stations in the Downtown St. Louis Ride Free Zone at lunch time on weekdays prior to the 2009 service reduction.Laclede's Landing station is the easternmost MetroLink station in Missouri, before crossing the Eads Bridge.

Millennium Hotel St. Louis
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
200 South 4th St
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 241-9500

The Millennium Hotel St. Louis, more commonly known simply as the Millennium Hotel, is a defunct hotel complex in downtown St. Louis, Missouri that closed in 2014. The lower complex consists of a plaza and several recreational facilities. Two towers, Millennium Hotel Tower I and Millennium Hotel Tower II, make up the hotel space. Tower I is 28 stories tall and was constructed in 1968. Tower II is 11 stories tall and was constructed in 1974. The building is adjacent to the Gateway Arch. Due to its closeness to several well known landmarks of St. Louis, it has become a popular tourist attraction. The hotel has 780 rooms and 19 suites. It also features a restaurant called "Top of the Riverfront", a rotating restaurant on the 28th floor of Tower I.HistoryThe Millennium Hotel was originally known as Stouffer's Riverfront Towers and later as the Regal Riverfront Hotel until it was acquired by Millennium Hotels and Resorts in 1999. For many years it was also known as The Clarion Hotel. It was designed by Tiernan Design and built by William B. Tabler Architects. In 2006, Millennium Hotel and Resorts hired Jay Campbell as the hotel's general manager. It closed in February 2014.As of October 2014, there were plans to renovate and reopen.

Basilica of St. Louis, King of France
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
209 Walnut St
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 231-3250

The Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, formerly the Cathedral of Saint Louis, and colloquially the Old Cathedral, was the first cathedral west of the Mississippi River and until 1845 the only parish church in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. It is one of two Catholic basilicas in St. Louis, and it is named for King Louis IX of France, also the namesake for the city of St. Louis.The current structure (built 1831-1834) is located near the historic riverfront of St. Louis, surrounded by but not a part of the Gateway Arch grounds. Because of the historical significance of the church, it was left intact while all neighboring buildings were demolished to make way for the Gateway Arch. The basilica currently serves as a personal parish church rather than a territorial parish church, and therefore ranks 177th of 196 churches in number of Catholics per church in the Archdiocese of St. Louis.However, because of its historical significance (and its location along the Mississippi River near the iconic Arch), the basilica remains a popular church for marriage ceremonies in the archdiocese (ranking second of 196 churches) and a popular tourist destination.HistoryPrevious structuresWhen Pierre Laclède and Auguste Chouteau established the city of St. Louis, they dedicated a plot of land west of Laclède's home for the purposes of the Catholic Church. The earliest Catholic records suggest that a tent was used by an itinerant priest in 1766, but by 1770, a small log house was built on the site. This building, consecrated by the Reverend Pierre Gibault, an itinerant priest, on June 24, 1770, was expanded in 1776 to include a log church. In spite of a more substantial structure, no priest permanently resided in the village of St. Louis until 1811.

Mississippi Nights
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
914 N 1st St
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 421-3853

Mississippi Nights was a music club in St. Louis, Missouri. It was located at 914 N 1st Street, on the western bank of the Mississippi River, four blocks north of the Gateway Arch in Laclede's Landing.Concerts at the venue, which held up to 1,000 people, were often "all ages" events, with just over one percent restricted to patrons 21 and over.The club is the subject of a song on the They Might Be Giants album Venue Songs. George Thorogood & the Destroyers' album Live: Let's Work Together features tracks recorded at Mississippi Nights.ClosureIn early 2003, rumors began circulating that the club would close to make way for Lumière Place, a new casino development. The rumors were confirmed in early 2007, and the last show was held on January 19, 2007.The last band to play on its stage was The Urge fronted by a band member from Mudworm, which also played. The Urge sold out 93 of 100 shows at Mississippi Nights.

Eugene Field House (St. Louis)
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
634 S Broadway
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 421-4689

The Eugene Field House is a historic house museum at 634 South Broadway in St. Louis, Missouri. Built in 1829, it was the home of Roswell Field, an attorney for Dred Scott in the landmark Dred Scott v. Sandford court case. Field's son, Eugene Field, was raised there and became a noted writer of children's stories. A National Historic Landmark, it is now a museum known as the Eugene Field House & St. Louis Toy Museum.DescriptionThe Field House is located just south of Downtown St. Louis, at the northeast corner of South Broadway and Cerre Street. It is largely surrounded by parking lots, with Interstate 64 a short way to the north. It is a three story brick building, three bays wide, with a side gable roof whose end wall sections are raised. The entrance is in the leftmost bay, in a panelled recess. The windows have stone sills and lintels.HistoryThe house was built in 1845, and was once part of a row of similar buildings called Walsh's Row. Most of these were torn down in the 20th century. Threatened with demolition, the house was transferred to the St. Louis Board of Education in 1936. Restored with funding from local preservationists, it opened as a museum to Eugene Field later that year. It was turned over to the Landmarks Association of St. Louis in 1968, and to the Eugene Field House Foundation in 1981. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2007, for its association with attorney Roswell Field, who was Eugene Field's father, and a lead attorney for Dred Scott. Field's legal work set the stage for Scott's final appeal to the United States Supreme Court, which was rejected in the 1857 Dred Scott v. Sandford decision, in which Chief Justice Roger B. Taney issued a polemic decision denying African Americans United States citizenship.

St. Mary of Victories Church
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
744 S 3rd St
St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 231-8101

The Church of St. Mary of Victories is a historic Roman Catholic church in downtown St. Louis, Missouri in the Chouteau's Landing Historic District south of the Gateway Arch. It was established in 1843, and was the second Catholic Church to be built in the city. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places.HistoryThe church was built to serve the needs of about 500 families who had emigrated from Germany. It is located in the hub of the pioneer "Chouteau's Landing" District, one of the early commercial and residential neighborhoods where the German immigrants settled in pre-Civil War era St. Louis. It took its name from a noted feast day proclaimed by Pope St. Pius V to celebrate the victory of the Christian Navy over Islamic forces in the Battle of Lepanto, off the coast of Italy in the Adriatic Sea in 1571. The church is also a consecrated church (1866) at the direction of Pope Pius IX. It also has an indulgenced High Altar (where hundreds of relics of saints are entombed) bestowed by Pope Leo XIII in the late 19th century.St. Mary's served as the first ethnic parish and spiritual home to the German Roman Catholic population of the city for the next century. It also provided a temporary home to a small community of Lebanese immigrants in the 20th-century, who went on to found a church in their own—present-day St. Raymond Maronite Cathedral in LaSalle Park neighborhood. St. Raymond's is now the Cathedral for the Maronite Eparchy west of the Mississippi River in the USA. Its former Archbishop, Most. Rev. Robert J. Shaheen, built the present St. Raymond's Cathedral under his pastoral administration.The 1950s saw the departure from the city of a large number of the families whose German ancestors had worshiped there. They were replaced by a large community of refugees from Hungary after World War II and the 1956 Hungarian Uprising. They gave new life to the parish, which became unofficially called the "Hungarian Church" (Magyar Templom).

I support Shady Jacks
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
1432 N Broadway
St. Louis, Missouri, MO 63102

(314) 241-4644

The Darkness Haunted House
Distance: 1.2 mi Competitive Analysis
DARKNESS: 1525 S 8th St., St. Louis MO
St. Louis, MO 63104

(314) 241-3456

St. John Nepomuk Parish Historic District
Distance: 1.3 mi Competitive Analysis
1125 Lafayette
St. Louis, MO 63104

St. John Nepomuk Parish Historic District is centered on the Catholic parish of St. John Nepomuk in the Soulard neighborhood of St. Louis, Missouri, United States. The historic district is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.HistorySt. John Nepomuk was established as a national Bohemian parish in 1854. It was the first such parish founded in the United States. At one time a Czech language newspaper was published in one of the parish buildings. As the parish grew new church buildings were built in 1873 and 1887. The present church, however, is largely an 1897 reconstruction. The building had been largely damaged in a tornado the previous year. The parish school, which sits across Eleventh Street from the church, was begun in 1869. It was staffed by the School Sisters of Notre Dame. In 1971 the church building and six ancillary buildings were designated a City Landmark in St. Louis and they were listed as an historic district on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The parish was closed in 2005, but the church building has remained active as a chapel.ArchitectureChicago architect Adolphus Druiding designed the Gothic Revival-style church. He is known for the many Catholic churches, schools, rectories and convents that he designed, especially in the Midwestern United States. The exterior of the church is composed of brick, which blends in with the other buildings on Soulard.