CloseDB Find Your Competitors

Capital City Club, Atlanta GA | Nearby Businesses


7 John Portman Boulevard
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 522-3081

The Capital City Club is a private social club located in Atlanta, Georgia. Chartered on May 21, 1883, it is one of the oldest private clubs in the South.HistoryAccording to its charter, the purpose of the club is "to promote the pleasure, kind feeling and general culture of its members." Harry C. Stockdell was the club's first president. He was succeeded in 1884 by Robert J. Lowry; and in 1885 Livingston Mims began the longest term as president, serving, with a two-year interruption, from 1886 through 1906. Subsequent presidents have all served two years or less.The first club house was located at 43 Walton Street. In August 1884, the club moved to a new establishment at 114 Peachtree Street. The Club presently operates three facilities for the use of its members, the oldest of which, the downtown Atlanta club building on John Portman Blvd., was dedicated on December 16, 1911. Herbert Barker was the original architect of the golf course, which was completed in 1911. The Capital City Country Club, located in Brookhaven, was leased in 1913 and purchased in 1915. At that time the golf course was increased from nine to eighteen holes. The present country club building was erected in 1928. In the autumn of 2002 an additional club facility, the Crabapple Golf Club, was completed on 600acre in the northern portion of Fulton County, Georgia.

Historical Place Near Capital City Club

The Fox Theatre
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
660 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta, GA 30308

(404) 881-2100

In December 2009, Billboard Magazine ranked the Fox Theatre in Atlanta as "The #1 non-residency venue worldwide for the decade (5,000 seats or less)." The Fox Theatre is located on Peachtree Street in the middle of the city. Not only is it on the National Historic Register, but it is one of the most beloved landmarks in the city because it is a real memory maker for the citizens of Atlanta. They may have come here to see their first performance or Broadway show, they had their first date here, and maybe even had their first kiss in the balcony. Our ballrooms are spectacular and have hosted everything from Sweet 16s to weddings and corporate events. We hold a special place in many people’s hearts, and we take that responsibility very seriously. We call it “The Fox Experience.” We hope you enjoy your experience here at the Fox!

Underground Atlanta
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
50 Alabama St SW, Uppr
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 523-2311

Festival Marketplace in the heart of downtown Atlanta with shopping, dining & special events!

Grady Memorial Hospital
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
80 Jesse Hill Jr Drive SE
Atlanta, GA 30303

+14046161000

Grady Memorial Hospital, frequently referred to as Grady Hospital or simply Grady, is the largest hospital in the state of Georgia and the public hospital for the city of Atlanta. It is the fifth-largest public hospital in the United States, as well as one of the busiest Level I trauma centers in the country. Historical segregation of its hospital units meant that it was also called "The Gradys," a name that still surfaces among elderly Atlanta residents, especially African-Americans. Located downtown next to the campus of Georgia State University, Grady is considered to be one of the premier public hospitals in the Southern United States. It is named for Henry W. Grady, an Atlanta Constitution journalist and later owner who became a major force in Georgia politics, and advocated for a public city hospital. It is now the flagship of the Grady Health System.

Georgia State Capitol
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
206 Washington St SW
Atlanta, GA 30334

(404) 330-6000

The Georgia State Capitol, in Atlanta, Georgia, in the United States, is an architecturally and historically significant building. It has been named a National Historic Landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is the main office building of Georgia's government. The offices of the governor, lieutenant governor, and secretary of state are on the second floor, while the General Assembly meets on the third floor from January to April. The fourth floor houses visitors' galleries overlooking the legislative chambers and a museum.HistoryThe capitol site was occupied previously by the first Atlanta City Hall. To encourage the state government to relocate the capital city to rapidly growing and industrialized Atlanta from rural Milledgeville, the city donated the site. The first capitol in Louisville no longer stands, while in Augusta and Savannah the legislature met in makeshift facilities, perhaps causing (or caused by) the alternation of those two cities as capital. The legislature also met at other places, including Macon, especially during and just after the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War.

Martin Luther King Jr. Birthplace and Memorial
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
501 Auburn Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30312

(404) 526-8900

Ebenezer Baptist Church
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
101 Jackson Street, NE
Atlanta, GA 30312

(404) 688-7300

Fulton County Courthouse
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
160 Pryor St SW
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 613-5040

The Fulton County Courthouse, built between 1911 and 1914, is an historic courthouse building located at 136 Pryor Street SW in Atlanta, seat of Fulton County, Georgia. It was designed by noted Atlanta-based architect A. Ten Eyck Brown (1878–1940), along with the Atlanta firm of Morgan & Dillon. It is officially the Lewis R. Slaton Courthouse.On September 18, 1980, the original building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. An annex across the street is connected via skywalk. Both are located in South Downtown.In March 2005, Brian Nichols overpowered and escaped from a sheriff's deputy at the courthouse, causing her brain damage, and then killed the judge in his rape trial, a court reporter, and another deputy, and later a man at another location, before kidnapping and holding a woman hostage. He was found guilty of all 54 counts against him at his trial, which was moved to Atlanta Municipal Court to avoid the crime scene where most of the killing spree occurred.

The Curb Market
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
209 Edgewood Ave SE
Atlanta, GA 30303

A public market housing vendors selling fresh produce, meat, a full service bakery, and eleven uniquely different eateries. Most of the businesses inside the market are or have been incubated inside. Six have gone on to successfully open other locations. With more to come. Locals frequently refer to it as the Curb Market. Refer to our website www.thecurbmarket.com for contact numbers for merchants.

Atlanta City Hall
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
68 Mitchell St. SW
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 330-6000

The Atlanta City Hall building is the headquarters of the City of Atlanta government. It was constructed in 1930, and is located in Downtown Atlanta. It is a high-rise office tower very similar to dozens of other city halls built in the United States during the same time period. Located in South Downtown, it is near other governmental structures, such as the Georgia State Capitol and the Fulton County Courthouse. The Neo-Gothic structure features many architectural details that have helped to make the building a historical landmark. It is Atlanta's fourth city hall.HistoryEarly city hall buildingsAfter half a decade of makeshift meeting places for city business, in 1853 mayor of Atlanta John Mims purchased the four-acre "Peters's Reserve" from Richard Peters for $5,000. On this land was built a two-story brick structure for the city hall as well as some court functions. Each floor was 70 by 100ft providing nearly 15000sqft of space. It opened on October 17, 1854 and served for three decades during which time it served as campgrounds for the occupying Union army during the war and was briefly the state capitol during 1868 when the capital first moved from Milledgeville, Georgia. It was demolished in 1885. In 1882, Atlanta City Hall was relocated to the old chamber of commerce building, which was four stories tall and located on the northeast corner of Pryor and Hunter . It was the city hall from 1882 to 1911.

Dr Martin Luther King Museum and Historic Site
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
450 Auburn Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30312

Dahlberg Hall
Distance: 0.5 mi Competitive Analysis
30 Courtland St NE
Atlanta, GA 30330

MLK Center
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
449 Auburn Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30312

Hurt Building
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
50 Hurt Plz SE
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 688-7368

The Hurt Building is an 18-story building at 50 Hurt Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia. Built between 1913 and 1926, the bulk of the building was completed in 1913, with a courtyard, entry rotunda and a wing extending final completion to 1926. It was built by Joel Hurt, an Atlanta developer to a design by the New York architectural firm of J.E.R. Carpenter. The Hurt Building is a flatiron building, occupying a triangular site, with the rotunda at the apex. With restrained ornamentation, it occupies a middle ground between Beaux Arts classicism and the emerging modernist aesthetic.One of the nation’s earliest skyscrapers, the first tenant occupied the Hurt Building in October 1913. Standing 18 floors in height and said to be the 17th largest office building in the world at the time of its construction, it is considered a good example of the skyscraper developed by Louis Sullivan and The Chicago School. World War I delayed construction of the building’s north and south wings and light well until 1924. Six decades later, beginning in 1983, The Hurt Building was completely renovated, inside and out, reopening in 1985.The Hurt Building's lower four floors were designed to envelope the maximum allowable building site, except the western building apex, which was constructed 30-feet back in order to enhance window area and promote the majestic view of Atlanta’s burgeoning city. The upper 13-floors of the building, configured in a “V” are appointed by an open light well, accentuated by elevated garden areas. The building is constructed of steel frame and reinforced concrete. The building envelope is uninterrupted marble and glazed brick piers with ornamental terra cotta spandrels terminating in a heavy decorative cornice exemplifying the craftsmanship of the early 1900s.

The William Oliver
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
32 Peachtree St NW
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 522-1855

AMENITIES Expansive rooftop deck with gardens and panoramic city views. A classic Art Deco building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 17 floors of hand-carved granite and limestone. All units renovated with loft theme; oversized, historic windows, exposed ducts/pipes, and high, concrete ceilings. Many units feature exotic flooring such as bamboo and limestone, mahogany wall and window treatments, and gourmet kitchens with solid-surface countertops and stainless appliances. Ornate lobby featuring fully restored elevators, highly polished brass ornamentation, 1930's chandeliers and an art deco ceiling mural. Formal Security. High-speed Internet service included; state-of-the-art, wired infrastructure upgraded in 2007. Basic cable included; wired infrastructure upgraded in 2007. Basement and floor level storage rooms available. Building common areas and rooftop wired for music. Security system includes 24-hour camera surveillance in all building common areas and front door entrance. Fitness center. Business Center. Rooftop Clubroom. Management office with meeting room common area. Unparalleled downtown location facing Woodruff Park and surrounded by Georgia State University; walking distance to CNN Center, Turner Field, Phillips Arena, Georgia Aquarium, Peachtree Center, Government complexes, transportation, hotel and business centers. Art Deco opulence, spectacular city skyline views, rooftop deck with gardens, formal security- not your typical Condo amenities. But then, The William Oliver is not at all typical. The 133,000-square-foot, 17-story William Oliver Building was built by Atlanta's legendary Healey family in 1930. The name was inspired by two Healey family grandsons, William and Oliver. Recently, The William Oliver won a Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation Outstanding Achievement Award for Rehabilitation. Original design features include hand-tooled metal and hand-carved granite and marble on the exterior, hand-tooled brass inside and marble and travertine floors. The William Oliver is located at the gateway of downtown's Fairlie-Poplar Historic District. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, it combines the best of old-world charm with modern day amenities. Completely renovated in 1996, this classic 1930's architectural gem is the finest remaining example of classic Art Deco design in Georgia. The lavish Art Deco lobby with authentic murals and façade creates a classic and welcoming tone for residents and guests and the grandeur of a bygone era. There are eight floor plans of studios, one- and two- bedroom homes and six penthouses ranging from 465 to 1,310 square-feet. Several condominiums have original glass office doors, one still bearing the name of its corporate occupant. The building combines the best of the old world charm with modern day amenities. The seventeen floors are a masterpiece of hand curved granite and limestone. Original terrazzo marble floors and hand curved brass elevators and building ornamentations. Soaring ceilings heights and oversized windows create the expansive urban flair, fused with standard finishes and upgrades including stainless steel appliances, exotic floorings such as bamboo, Portuguese cork and Italian limestone, granite and Corian countertops, Shaker & Winstead 42-inch kitchen vanity cabinets, designer faucets and under mount stainless kitchen & porcelain bath sinks. Since 1930, The William Oliver has proudly stood on the historic corner of Peachtree and Marietta Streets. The William Oliver sits within Fairlie Poplar, once Atlanta's financial district, now its first true urban neighborhood. From the grand entry with bronze canopy and formal security to the rooftop deck, The William Oliver is stylishly approachable and an appealing alternative to life outside the city. Adjacent to the extended campus of Georgia State University, The William Oliver boasts a one-of-a-kind location strategically situated between Centennial Olympic Park and Woodruff Park. You can't help but enjoy outdoor concerts, eclectic art galleries, nearby theaters, museums and even front row rooftop seats to fireworks from Turner Field, Centennial Park, and Underground Atlanta (NY’s Eve Peachdrop!). The William Oliver features uniformed security, an outstanding rooftop landscaped deck with unmatched breathtaking citywide views, business center, vending area, pet friendly atmosphere, storage rooms, spacious fitness center, basic cable TV, community intranet and high speed internet service. A builder of downtown lofts since the late 1980's, developer Rick Skelton conceived the William Oliver Building project with its original owner, James Cumming, as "a partnership of housing and retail expertise working together to build a more vibrant, 24-hour downtown." Financed through an Urban Residential Finance Authority tax-exempt bond, The William Oliver project reflects a national trend toward redevelopment of neglected downtown properties into loft space. One of the city's few remaining skyscrapers of its era, the building is one of the largest surviving examples of what Skelton calls the "true classic deco style" of architecture, which was meant to "show what machines were capable of doing" in the realm of architectural design. Jason Moss of Rowhouse Design Group, in collaboration with Stang & Newdow, designed the project, which included restoration of an expansive deco mural on the lobby ceiling, where two large chandeliers also were refurbished. "We restored the lobby to its pristine form," Skelton said. Skelton Development has received numerous prestigious awards for their achievements in historically sensitive renovations like 90 Fairlie, Deer Lofts, and Stonewall Battery. Skelton Development chose Rowhouse Architects, an Atlanta firm known for their innovative urban designs for new and historic projects. Exclusive sales and marketing for The William Oliver was provided by Coldwell Banker The Condo Store, recognized as Atlanta's experts and premier marketer of condominiums, lofts, luxury high rises, cluster and townhomes. Skelton describes the interior spaces of the units as having a "soft" loft attitude with soaring ceilings, oversized windows for spectacular citywide views, and minimal exposed duct work. While retaining the original terrazzo marble floors and classic art deco lobby, the William Oliver offers buyers the opportunity to upgrade the interiors of their units for a very modern feel with stainless steel appliances and exotic floorings such as bamboo and Portuguese cork. In addition to modern aesthetics, the William Oliver offers modern technology with high speed internet services and cable TV. "The unique historic design of The William Oliver was a selling factor for the development," says Skelton. "No one could afford to build a lavish lobby of its type with granite and solid brass today. The facade of hand-carved granite and limestone is impossible to replicate and the building would have cost a fortune. Furthermore, the new urbanist concept dictates that people miss a sense of place and community. In redeveloping historic structures, we are giving people just that - their own place in history. " "The William Oliver is the largest art deco building in the South," says Skelton." The lobby and entry awning is solid brass, and it has the largest art deco mural in the South. This was the site of Atlanta's first election in 1832." "Downtown Atlanta offers residents a true Chicago-New York style environment," says Skelton. "Loft living has come into vogue, and tax incentives in the historic properties make living in urban Atlanta less expensive than their Midtown and Buckhead counterparts. Georgia State University is the catalyst for growth, and the University's move into Fairlie-Poplar is likened to New York University migrating into New York City's Soho district ." "We've got people living downtown now, and the next evolution is pets downtown," said Skelton. "With Woodruff, Centennial and Piedmont parks right here, Intown is a wonderful place for pets."Skelton says he regularly encountered potential buyers who hesitated to commit to a condo because they owned a pet. "I had to tell them that people do live downtown with pets," Skelton said. "Particularly people who live in suburbia think that just because they have a dog or a cat, they need a yard. But in the studies we've looked at, between 15 and 20 percent of the people in lofts and condos have some sort of pet. And to entice those buyers, you needed to have a pet-friendly environment." Today, The William Oliver is home to 115 upscale residential units with security and a "lock and leave" lifestyle for its residents. Business professionals, airline pilots, government employees, empty nesters and even second home owners can conveniently walk to work as well as to artistic and entertainment venues for after hours enjoyment.

Healey Building
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
57 Forsyth Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 588-0109

The Healey Building, at 57 Forsyth Street NW, in the Fairlie-Poplar district of Atlanta, was the last major "skyscraper" built during the first great burst of multi-story commercial construction preceding World War I. In fact, it was World War I, which led to the alteration of the original design, which called for twin towers connected by a rotunda. Only the west tower and rotunda were constructed before World War I broke out. The death in 1920 of William Healey forestalled continuation of the project after the war. According to Dr. Elizabeth Lyon in her National Register of Historic Places nomination, "The Healey Building has an elegance and high shouldered dignity which make it outstanding among its contemporaries." Those contemporaries include the Chandler, the Flatiron and Hurt Buildings among others. Although certainly distinctive for its physical appearance and location, the Healey Building is also associated with significant individuals in Atlanta history. Thomas G. Healey and his son William T. Healey were political and business leaders in the city - in the case of Thomas, dating back to pre-Civil War times. Their contributions to Atlanta's architectural history as contractors and businessmen are numerous and significant. In addition to the Healeys, the architects Thomas Morgan, John Dillon, and Walter T. Downing have left an important body of works as monuments to their skill and abilities.Born in 1818, Thomas G. Healey moved to Savannah, Ga. in 1846, from Connecticut. A few years later, he was in Atlanta working in the brick-making business and as builder/contractor in partnership with Maxwell Berry. Healey and Berry were responsible for a number of Atlanta churches and government buildings prior to the war, including the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Trinity Methodist Church, First Presbyterian Church, and the United States Custom House (later City Hall). Following the destruction of the war, Healey was in the perfect business for the construction boom of the late 1800s, which rebuilt Atlanta. As his wealth accumulated, T. G. Healey became active in politics and other business ventures. One investment was in land, including the northwest corner of Marietta and Peachtree Streets where he built the first Healey Building. This location was the place where Atlanta's first elections were held in 1848 and where T. G. Healey's grandsons (William and Oliver) built the William-Oliver Building in 1930. From 1877 to 1882, Healey was president of the Atlanta Gas Light Company. In the 1880s, he was president of the West End and Atlanta Street Railroad Company, on the Executive Committee of the 1881 International Cotton Exhibition, and a Director of Joel Hurt's Atlanta Home Insurance Company (of which he was a purchaser of $5,000 in original stock). Politically, he was city alderman- at-large (1881) and mayor pro tem (1884). By 1889, the Atlanta Constitution was estimating Healey's wealth at between $500,000 and $1,000,000 - thus making him one of the fifteen richest men in the city. During this period, William T. Healey joined his father in his many business ventures, which still included brick making and real estate development. Among their joint enterprises were the Atlanta Car Works streetcar line (1892) and the development of a mineral water property, Austell Lithia Springs. After Thomas Healey's death in 1897, William carried on the family businesses, which came to include the new Healey Building of 1914. Excavations took most of 1913 and the project became known as "Healey's Hole," with seventy (seven feet square) wells filled with concrete reaching a depth of sixty feet.

City Hall of Atlanta
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
68 Mitchell St SW
Atlanta, GA 30303

North Avenue Presbyterian Church
Distance: 0.7 mi Competitive Analysis
607 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta, GA 30308

(404) 875-0431

North Avenue Presbyterian Church is a historic Presbyterian church at 607 Peachtree Avenue, NE in Atlanta, Georgia. The church building was completed in 1900 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.As the city grew to the north, several Presbyterians felt the need for a new church in the area. The first organizational meeting for the new church were held about 1894 by Mrs. Joseph M. High, Mrs. J. D. McCarty, and Mrs. Clem Harris, who were members of the First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta. The official founding was in December 1898 and included 100 members from First Presbyterian, 15 from Central Presbyterian Church, and one from Athens Presbyterian Church.

Sweet Auburn Springfest
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
Auburn Avenue
Atlanta, GA 30303

(678) 683-5647

Perfect opportunity fir sponsors corporations and business to sell, market and brand their product.

Kessler City Lofts
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
87 Peachtree St SW
Atlanta, GA 30303

After Kessler's department store closed in 1998, this building was converted to loft condominiums in 2000. Featuring exposed brick walls, high ceilings, and maple floors, it provides easy access to MARTA and downtown attractions like Centennial Olympic Park, the Georgia Dome, and Phillips Arena. It also houses a close-knit community of residents (and their pets) who are dedicated to the downtown community. The building is celebrating its centennial in 2013 - stay tuned for more about the celebration!

Odd Fellows Building and Auditorium
Distance: 0.6 mi Competitive Analysis
228--250 Auburn Ave., NE
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 525-5027

The Odd Fellows Building and Auditorium, located at 228—250 Auburn Avenue, N.E. in the Sweet Auburn Historic District of Atlanta, Georgia, are historic buildings built in 1912 and 1913, respectively, as the headquarters of the District Grand Lodge No. 18, Jurisdiction of Georgia, of the Grand United Order of Odd Fellows in America. B.S. Ingram was District Grand Master and Dr. William F. Penn was chairman of the building committee. Renowned Atlanta-based architect William Augustus Edwards designed the buildings, while Robert E. Pharrow was the contractor and M.B. Morton was superintendent of construction. Booker T. Washington dedicated the Odd Fellows Building in 1912.The Odd Fellows Building and Auditorium are closely linked with Benjamin Jefferson Davis, Sr. (1870–1945), Atlanta's most influential black journalist, who edited the Atlanta Independent, the official organ of District No. 18. He was District Grand Secretary and a member of the Building Committee when they were built.The Odd Fellows Building, called the Tower, is 6 stories high while the Auditorium next door, called the Annex, is 2 stories with an atrium that adds another 2 or 3 stories in height. Both are built of redbrick except for the first floor of the Tower which is stone. The Annex was used for many years as a movie house and was the only major venue in Atlanta where blacks could be seated on the main floor. In addition to providing meeting and office space for the Odd Fellows, the Tower provided office and store space for black-owned businesses and black professionals. Its flat roof was used for dances for many years.

Landmark and Historical Place Near Capital City Club

AmericasMart
Distance: 0.0 mi Competitive Analysis
240 Peachtree St NW, Ste 2200
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 523-1229

AmericasMart Atlanta is located in Atlanta, Georgia and is one of the world's largest permanent wholesale trade centers. AmericasMart Atlanta consists of four buildings totaling seven million square feet. The Mart opened in 1957 and hosts several trade shows every year including Market Wednesday, Atlanta Apparel, Atlanta Spring Immediate Delivery, and The Atlanta International Gift and Home Furnishings Market. Trade show exhibitors rent permanent showrooms as well as temporary booths during trade shows. Some permanent showrooms are open daily, though many are open only part of the time or during trade shows. AmericasMart Atlanta is not open to the public and only employees and guests of registered businesses are admitted.StructureAmerica’s Mart Atlanta consists of four buildings, Building One, Building Two, Building Two WestWing, and Building Three. The Mart’s main address is 240 Peachtree Street NW, Suite 2200, which is where the first building is located. Buildings Two and Three are located on Spring Street and Building Two WestWing is located on Williams Street. 24 pedestrian bridges connect the different buildings of the Mart for indoor access between buildings.HistoryA local architect of Atlanta, John C. Portman, designed the Atlanta Mart. The Mart opened in 1957, and Portman has held many positions of leadership since the founding. These include chairman of the board, chief executive officer, and a director. John Portman’s son, Jeffery Portman serves as the President of AMC, Inc., since 1994. AMC is the trading organization which is the parent company of AmericasMart Atlanta. In 1996 Jeffery Portman renamed the trading center AmericasMart, as before it was known as the Atlanta Market Center. He has worked to expand the Mart since his presidency, and is responsible for the Building Two WestWing, which opened in 2009 and is the newest addition.

The Armory at Dragon*Con
Distance: 0.1 mi Competitive Analysis
265 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta, GA 30303

(214) 478-7856

The Armory is an exhibit/ presentation that takes place once a year at DragonCon in Atlanta. It consists of a museum-quality display of military weapons and equipment paired with panel discussions about their science and history. The display is curated by noted military historian Kevin Dockery and includes pieces from stone knives to nuclear weapons (inert of course), This track was created to educate, inform and entertain. The only items ever sold at The Armory are books and posters. These are the types of items seen only in museums or by those using them in the field. This is a rare opportunity to see these items up close and ...very personal. Do not miss out!

Georgia-Pacific Tower
Distance: 0.2 mi Competitive Analysis
133 Peachtree St NE Bsmt
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 652-4000

Georgia-Pacific Tower est un gratte-ciel situé à Atlanta (Géorgie, États-Unis), dont la construction s'est achevée en 1982.Il est le sixième plus haut gratte-ciel de la ville d'Atlanta. L'immeuble mesure 212 mètres et possède 52 étages.L'immeuble fut dessinée par la firme d'architecte Skidmore, Owings and Merrill.Le siège social de la société Georgia-Pacific est situé dans ce bâtiment.Voir aussiArticles connexes Liste des gratte-ciel de l'agglomération d'AtlantaLiens externes Georgia-Pacific Tower sur Skycraperpage Georgia-Pacific Tower sur Emporis

SkyView Atlanta
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
168 Luckie St NW
Atlanta, GA 30303

(678) 949-9023

We are open every single day of the year, unless there are weather or general maintenance issues. Please be sure to check our Facebook page for day-to-day updates on our regular hours. Adult - $13.89+tax Senior - $12.50+tax Military - $12.50+tax Child - $9.26+tax (Each Gondola must have an Adult riding with the children) Payment Methods: Cash, Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover credit or debit cards. For more information visit our website at www.SkyViewAtlanta.com For group or event sales please contact [email protected] Follow on Instagram @skyviewatl and Twitter @SkyViewAtlanta. SkyView Atlanta is a 200-foot tall Ferris wheel in the southern end of Centennial Olympic Park. It is located next to The Tabernacle and within walking distance from World of Coca-Cola, Georgia Aquarium, National Civil and Human Rights Museum, College Football Hall of Fame, CNN Center, Phillips Arena, The Georgia Dome, and the Georgia World Congress Center.

90 Fairlie Condominium
Distance: 0.3 mi Competitive Analysis
90 Fairlie St NW
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 522-0120

Nine stories tall, its 21 units have been updated as boutique loft style condos. Windows span from floor to ceiling, some 15 ft tall. Inside, you'll find restaurant quality kitchens, wood floors, and open floor plans. The building is nestled in the center of what has become a small theater district where the corner is shared by a Federal courthouse and s popular pizza shop.

German Bierfest Atlanta
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
Woodruff Park, Auburn Ave Northeast
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 262-1800 Ext 712

The 13th Annual German Bierfest™ will be held on Saturday, August 20, 2016 from 2-7 p.m. at Woodruff Park in downtown Atlanta. You can find more information at http://www.germanbierfest.com Presented by: the German American Chamber of Commerce of the Southern U.S., Inc.

Georgia Aquarium
Distance: 0.4 mi Competitive Analysis
225 Baker St NW
Atlanta, GA 30313

(404) 581-4000

Hours of Operation vary: Please visit http://www.georgiaaquarium.org/plan-your-visit/ We love all of our fans! We do ask you to remember that this is a fan page. We are excited about a dialogue with our fans, and are open to everyone's comments and opinions. However, we ask you not to ruin our fans’ experience here by using inappropriate or offensive language, or by posting information that is factually incorrect or even violent in nature. If through your words or actions you demonstrate that you are clearly not a fan of Georgia Aquarium and do not support its mission of education, conservation, entertainment and research, and create an environment which damages the fan experience, then your comments will be deleted and you will be denied participation on this page. If you have any concerns or need assistance, please e-mail us at [email protected] Thanks for your cooperation!

AT&T Midtown Center
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
675 W Peachtree St NW
Atlanta, GA 30308

678-867-7050

AT&T Midtown Center I is a 206.4m, 47-story skyscraper in Midtown Atlanta, Georgia. Completed in 1982, it serves as the regional headquarters of BellSouth Telecommunications, which does business as AT&T Southeast, and was acquired as part of AT&T's acquisition of BellSouth. BellSouth Corporate headquarters was located in the Campanile building, also in Midtown.BackgroundThe company, then called Southern Bell, originally planned to build the parking deck for the tower one block further east at the corner of Ponce de Leon Avenue and Peachtree Street. This would have required the razing of the historic Fox Theatre which would have been an especially great loss to the city after the downtown Loew's Grand Theatre was destroyed by fire in 1978. Tremendous opposition, protests, fundraising, and petition drives within the community prevented the Fox's demolition. Even Liberace spoke out on behalf of the "Fabulous Fox". In the end, a complicated deal was struck to build the parking deck on an alternate site north of the main tower on West Peachtree Street.

Tech Tower
Distance: 0.8 mi Competitive Analysis
225 North Ave NW
Atlanta, GA 30313

Supreme Court of Georgia
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
47 Trinity Ave SW
Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 463-6782

The Supreme Court of Georgia is the highest judicial authority of the US state of Georgia. The court was established in 1845 as a three-member panel. Since 1896, the justices (increased in number to six, and then to seven in 1945) have been elected by the people, and today those elections are non-partisan. Three of the state's seven sitting Justices were re-elected, all unopposed, in 2012.The first Chief Justice of the Court was Joseph Henry Lumpkin, who was appointed in 1863. There have been 27 Chief Justices, and the current Chief Justice of the Court is Hugh P. Thompson.Bar admissionsThe Supreme Court of Georgia is unusual among state high courts in that it does not admit new lawyers to the state bar. Instead, new lawyers are admitted to practice by the superior court of a county where they live or wish to practice. The new lawyers must separately seek admission to the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court.

688 Club
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
688 Spring St NW
Atlanta, GA 30308

The 688 Club was a popular alternative music venue in Atlanta, Georgia, located at 688 Spring Street, near the intersection of Spring and 3rd Streets. The 688 Club opened in May 1980 and closed in November 1986. The club was operated by Steve May. The club was co-owned by Tony Evans, John Wicker, and in its final years by Mike Hendry. Cathy Hendrix served as the club's music director. During its brief lifetime, the 688 played host to hundreds of punk rock, new wave and alternative rock bands - many of whom would later become world-famous.During the early 1980s, the 688 Club was the primary place for up-and-coming bands from Atlanta and Athens, Georgia, to get noticed. Among the groups that regularly played there were R.E.M. and Pylon. The club spun off an independent record label, 688 Records, which survived for a time even after 688 Club had closed its doors. Dash Rip Rock's self-titled debut LP was the first album released by 688 Records.After 688 ClubThe club re-opened as the "686 Club" on December 31, 1986 but was renamed "The Rollick" the next day. By 1990, the space was occupied by a club called "Weekends". The club operated as an industrial/goth club known as Tyranny from 1995 - 2000. The space was later occupied by Outa Control Inc. Sometime thereafter, the original building was extensively remodeled, and houses a Concentra urgent care medical facility.

The Blu' Bisque
Distance: 0.9 mi Competitive Analysis
323 Nelson St SW
Atlanta, GA 30313

(404) 593-1431

Blu’ Bisque is a Paint-Your-Own-Canvas-plus-Pottery Studio and creative Events Space, nestled in historic Castleberry Hill, on Nelson Street. Unleash your creative side! Join us for Art & DIY classes, Canvas Over Cocktails, Princess Parties, Creative Kids Canvas and more! With great activities for adults and kids, Blu' Bisque makes the perfect girls’ night out, date night, kids’ play date, or personal R&R break. Everyday is BYOB! Before or after you create your masterpiece, shop in the Blu’ Bisque Boutique for unique finds and treasures. Our buyers select the finest merchandise, perfect for gifting or keeping. Celebrate your special occasions with Blu’ Bisque! Birthdays, Bridal Showers, Baby Showers, Girls Night Out and more. If you have a reason to celebrate, we can host it. Remember, you can bring your own food and beverage!

Georgia Tech main campus
Distance: 1.3 mi Competitive Analysis
640 WILLIAMS St NW
Atlanta, GA 30313

(404) 894-2470

Georgia Tech's main campus occupies part of Midtown Atlanta, bordered by 10th Street to the north and by North Avenue to the south, placing it well in sight of the Atlanta skyline. In 1996, the campus was the site of the athletes' village and a venue for a number of athletic events for the 1996 Summer Olympics. The construction of the Olympic village, along with subsequent gentrification of the surrounding areas enhanced the campus.The Georgia Tech campus is located in Midtown, an area north of downtown Atlanta. Although a number of skyscrapers—most visibly the headquarters of AT&T, The Coca-Cola Company, and Bank of America—are visible from all points on campus, the campus itself has few buildings over four stories and has a great deal of greenery. This gives it a distinctly suburban atmosphere quite different from other Atlanta campuses such as that of Georgia State University.